The Abstinence Of Sexual Education In Public Schools

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In this era where information is at the tip of your finger tips and everything can be found on the World Wide Web, the subject of sexual education in the classroom and whom should be educating teens is a topic of discussion many parents and educators have opposing views on. Studies show that sexual education should be taught in public schools to give a sexually active generation the tools to protect themselves and their partners from sexually transmitted diseases (STD’s) and teenage pregnancy. Opponent believe teen sex education should be left up to the parents or teach an abstinence only program. Let’s face it teenagers are sexually active. However, they are not aware of the full spectrum of STDs and are fed many myths associated with sex …show more content…
Today’s teens are in the digital age where all they need to know is on the internet and they don’t need to wait – instant gratification is the name of the game. They’re not waiting for marriage to learn what it’s all about now – they’re researching it, talking about it, and doing it. Moreover, they are doing it even before they get a proper education on it. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures on State Policies on Sex Education “A 2011 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) survey indicates that more than 47 percent of all high school students say they have had sex”(2015). But what is sex? And what is safe sex? The rebuttal to the Abstinence Only education addresses this broad statement of what is what – what does abstinence include or not …show more content…
Among the many myths out there on sex are oral sex and STDs, the pull-out method, sex on your period, not getting pregnant on your first sexual encounter, and the famous “everyone is doing it”. Our society has become more open to sex – as seen on TV, movies, and advertising. However, that does not mean teens are doing it more. Per MaryJo Oster on her article on Five Myths about Teen sex, “As of 2010, the median age of first sex was 17.8 years old for females and 18.1 for males. Essentially, this means kids today wait longer to start having sex than they have in the past” (2015). http://www.childtrends.org/five-myths-about-teen-sex/#sthash.uLcSuczQ.dpuf The misconception about not getting pregnant on your first time is debunked on Planned Parenthood’s page (where teens are supposed to get some of this sex education – but not all are). They clearly state: “FALSE. You can get pregnant anytime you have vaginal (penis-in-vagina) sex. If you 're having sex without birth control, you can get pregnant — whether it 's the first time or the 100th time. It 's even possible for to get pregnant before you have your first period. Bottom line: if you 're going to have vaginal sex, use birth control to prevent pregnancy.” ((https://www.plannedparenthood.org/teens/sex/the-ten-biggest-myths-about-sex). Which leads us to

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