1920s Culture

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The 1920s, conventionally referenced as the Roaring Twenties, was an era of great change and a time of exuberance in many regions of society. The world had just concluded the most immense war in history, World War I, and the United States of America was left virtually unharmed by the war. The U.S. was able to experience a decade of tranquility and prosperity succeeding the war. During this decade, America became the wealthiest country in the world. The denizens of the United States went through a vibrant period during this time. However, at the same time the 1920s was additionally a very rebellious and arduous time for many. The culture of it has influenced the literature, morals, music, and philosophy of America’s society today. The three …show more content…
Before the 1920s, the style of clothing and other forms of expression, especially for women, were completely different post World War. The articles of apparel women wore were very restricting and uncomfortable, thoroughly covering every inch of visible skin. For instance, “Between about 1880 and 1910, the ideal womens silhouette resembled the letter ‘S’. Bodies were boned and corseted into an hourglass shape, with waists forced into tiny circlets measuring less than 20 inches. The entire upper torso was thrust forward, creating a "pigeon front," and the hips were pointed backward and slightly up, finishing out the letter "S." Skirts hit the floor, and the sight of even an ankle was considered to be quite racy. Younger, skinnier women padded out their bosoms and hips in order to look older, and more shapely. Poufy Gibson Girl hairdos of the '00s and '10s were the primary style” (Yelland). The 1910s were a transitional time for clothing style. That S-shape began to diminish remotely and by the 1920s it took a dramatic turn. Women commenced to flatten their busts and hips and unbound their corsets. This period was the first time in …show more content…
Women had to assume the role of caretakers that only raised children and cooked food for their spouse. The 19th Amendment gave American women the right to vote, the right known as women’s suffrage, and was passed on August 18, 1920, resolving almost a century of protests. Before the 1920s, many organizations and movements were created to protest for Women's Suffrage but the expectation for Women were still very different and unfair. For example, “Most women were prohibited from voting or exercising the same civil rights as men during this time based on the idea that ‘a married woman’s legal existence was incorporated into that of her husband’. With so few rights, many women drew parallels between their social and political state and that of slaves” (Smiltneek). These comparisons gained support of larger numbers of men and women to their causes, among them were famous suffragists attributed with founding various woman's suffrage movements. This allowed women to eventually gain the right to vote which was in the form of the 19th Amendment. In addition, “‘The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.’ The amendment, which granted women the right to vote, represented the pinnacle of the women’s

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