Blacks And Slave Codes During The Civil Rights Movement

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What would it be like, back then, to have restrictions by the color of your skin? We as whites can’t possibly understand what it truly feels like to be fully discriminated against. During the Civil Rights Movement many events happened that showed that things never really changed. The Civil Rights Movement was trying to achieve equal access and basic opportunities for African Americans. The South was for discrimination, but the North was against it. The black and slaves codes show how the Southerners felt about the African American’s in the South. They treated them like their property and the blacks had no say in it. During this time the 13th, 14th and 15th were created to try and outlaw slavery. Also to give equal protection for both …show more content…
The Southerners created these codes or also called laws during 1865-1966. These codes could also be called the Jim Crow Laws. The first law that was composed was taken into action on November 22,1865. This law was to have civil officers hire orphaned African Americans and not let them leave. Next, the Mississippi legislature passed a vagrancy law which defined them as workers that "neglected their calling or employment or misspent what they earned." Another code that was instituted was that African Americans had to carry around written evidence that they were employed. In South Carolina there was a law in which it prohibited blacks from having any occupation other than being a farmer or a servant unless they were to pay an annual tax of $10 to $100. Finally, “Mississippi established a system of special county courts to punish blacks charged with violating one of the new state employment laws.” (“Black Codes.") If blacks refused to work then there would be "corporal chastisement" (“Black Codes.") or in other words harsh punishments. Once Mississippi established these laws the other Southern states started to create their own. These black codes made impacts on the Northerners by making them feel as if the codes were violating the “fundamental principles of free labor ideology.” (“Black Codes.") The black …show more content…
The 13th Amendment was passed on January 31, 1865 which abolished slavery. The 14th Amendment was passed on June 13, 1866 and it “extended liberties and rights granted by the Bill of Rights to former slaves.” ("Civil Rights Act of 1964.") The last Amendment during this period of time that was a huge help to putting an end to discrimination and slavery was the 15th Amendment. This granted male African Americans the right to vote. These three Amendments majorly helped to expand the Civil Rights. The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments were all created during the Reconstruction. These three Amendments all outlawed slavery and they guaranteed citizenship to the blacks. The three also implied that they were there to provide equal protection between the blacks and whites. Lastly, they protected the African American males right to vote. ("Civil Rights Act of

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