Richard Hoggart's Analysis Of Thatcherism

Great Essays
Staurt Hall was Inspired by Richard Hoggart's The Uses of Literacy (1958, 1970), Raymond Williams' Culture and Society (1958) and The Long Revolution (1961), and E.P. Thompson's The Making of the English Working Class (1963), the birth of British cultural studies is generally associated with the 1964 founding of the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies in Birmingham by Hoggart and Stuart Hall. Over the next two decades, as education in England faced severe economic hardship, cultural studies came to be offered as an undergraduate degree in nine British polytechnics (and two universities, including Birmingham): it provided a useful umbrella for humanities departments under economic pressure to reorganize.

Generally speaking, the Birmingham school focused on the processes shaping post-war British society: the rise of mass communications, the increase in consumerism and resulting commodification of more domains of life, and racial and national forms of oppression. Some of this research is linked
…show more content…
Hall contextualizes the Thatcher government in changes in the political character of postwar Britain. In the initial decades after WWII, Britain was headed toward European style social democracy. The post-war combination of big state and big capital was the result of a compromise between left and right: the right settled for the welfare state and Keynesian economic policy while the left agreed to work within the fundamental terms of capitalism. Responding to the massive upheavals of the late sixties and seventies; world economic recession, inability to finance a welfare state and sustain capital accumulation and profitability, industrial conflict, strikes, and violent racism against immigrants, Thatcherism reversed the previous consensus, reconstructed the social order, and "changed the currency of political thought and argument such that free meant, free market".(Hall 1988,

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    According to the name, financial assistance was to be lent to European nations in order to rebuild their nations and stabilize their economy following World War II. However, historians debate over whether the U.S. preventing the spread of communism was an intentional main goal or just a successful effect. Regardless, over the course of four years, over thirteen billion dollars was given in financial and material help to seventeen countries in Western and Southern Europe. Although it was initially offered to all of Europe, the Soviet satellite states withdrew in accordance with the Soviet implemented Cominform (Ludwig). The Soviet Union considered the Marshall Plan an attack against them and thereby instituted Cominform in September, 1947 which gathered the Eastern European communist nations as Soviet satellites to be rebuilt as Russian-style communism (Cominiform and Comicon).…

    • 1220 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    On the other hand, Samuelson advanced an opinion that chains of historical events were fortuitously coincided. However, his opinion did not consider the repeatability of recession and the similarity of economic issues. Also, others claimed theories based on banking crises and failure of the gold standard. The book, The World in Depression 1929-1939 by Kindleberger, stated the reasons that the global Great Depression became a long term event. Britain lost their guarantor position in the global economy and currency system.…

    • 960 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    British Imperial Policy

    • 1009 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Losing the North American colonies, and the thirteen colonies to American independence, during the end of the eighteenth century, caused a disruption of the colonial powers' trade patterns. "British exports fell by about one-fifth following the American Revolution".4 Britain's trade with northwestern Europe almost doubled. This caused Britain to seek other trade treaties with different European countries. The industrialization and importance of the export industries, like the cotton textiles, and the "increased pressure in favor of free trade as manufacturers increasingly complained about the protection afforded to agriculturists and the resulting higher food prices their workers paid".5 This led to the rise of the first political-pressure group. The United States would now have to produce tremendous amounts of goods, without help from other countries, which caused a huge problem for them.…

    • 1009 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    One example of this was in 1933 when Congress passed the National Recovery Act, allowing the government to balance the economy through planning and replace the existing capitalist system (Kelley 2017). After the war, elite policymakers in the Western world continued to practice these New Deal liberal principles to ensure economic stability and social welfare throughout the world. They developed the Bretton Woods Institutions, in order to improve the balance of payment problems and to provide financial assistance for postwar reconstruction and development in damaged European countries and the Global South. By the early 1970s, this form of liberalism was beginning to face a crisis of “stagflation,” which…

    • 963 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Plumb's Analysis

    • 1182 Words
    • 5 Pages

    He begins my stating how “Some…well-known (British) radicals…whose lavish patronage of liberal ideas helped to keep republican sentiment alive in the middle decades of the eighteenth century” (Plumb 73). Plumb continues by explaining the industrial relationship at hand “Of course, it is not…ally for the American cause” (Plumb 77-78) which, explored further, “was only partially due to…hands of the landowning classes” (Plumb 78). He explains how the political relationship affected trade, “The policy of successive ministries…turned itself into a European war” (Plumb…

    • 1182 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    According to Watson, the loosening of requirements for membership in international society was the first step towards a global society. In part three of the book, Watson examines the end of European domination after WWII. The significant increase of the number of members of international society plus the creation of new international norms such as anti-racism, anti-colonialism, and widespread support of economic development and equity created a new international society. One of the great virtues of Watson’s work is the treatment of the earlier systems of states from the Byzantium Empire to the first Arab empire. The difficulty that arises from such a survey is inevitably the discussion and analysis cannot be full or multi-faceted.…

    • 830 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Renaissance Europe saw the development of the so-called new monarchies. What were the guiding principles and basic tactics of the rulers of England, France, and Spain in their efforts to centralize their states? To what extent did these rulers rely on new policies and practices? How successful were the new monarchs? In the years prior to the New Monarchy, Europe had been devastated by the Black Plague.…

    • 935 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Thatcher's actions during the Falklands crisis brought democracy around the World. The third method to restore economic liberty in the West and to break the socialism's slowly development on Western societies. This problem was especially acute in Britain, which trade unions had a major impact. She stayed down trade unions influence because country's development was slow became influenced of the trade union's excessive strike. When the trade unions power declined, the country began considerably improved.…

    • 928 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Fifth Modernization

    • 921 Words
    • 4 Pages

    China underwent reform throughout the period known as the “long eighties”, which stretches from the late 1970s all the way until 1989 with the Tiananmen Massacre. In direct contrast to Maoist policies decrying capitalism and certain traditional elements of Chinese society, post-Cultural Revolution China saw economic reform moving them towards a market economy with greater openness to the West. Over time, people began calling for other reforms such as democratization, free speech, and a fix to government corruption. In Wei Jingsheng’s essay Fifth Modernization: Democracy and Liu Xiaobo’s written piece Xidan Democracy Wall and China’s Enlightenment, both authors, despite writing during two very different time periods, criticize ideologies from…

    • 921 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    A relating category that can be traced to Thatcher’s decisions through grounded theory, were the disputes, strikes and blackouts that occurred during 1970-79 under Prime Minister Heath’s rule. However, as Britain still relied on coal production, the mining industry gained more power over the government, and held power over strikes. This is theorised to be the reason why Prime Minister Heath was not re-elected, resulting in Thatcher becoming Prime Minister. (Unknown, 2015) A contributing factor to Thatchers decision to close British mines, was her re-election due to her win in the Falkland Island War in 1983. It began when the Argentine forces invaded the Falkland Islands.…

    • 1882 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays