Food Desert, By Ellen Smirl: Comparative Analysis

Improved Essays
Comparative Analysis Title
This comparison pertains to the similarities and meager differences of “Why It Takes More Than a Grocery Store to Eliminate a ‘Food Desert’” by Sarah Corapi and “Social Justice Deficits in The Local Food Movement: Local Food and Low-Income Realities” by Ellen Smirl. I chose to compare these two articles because they both shine a light on the corresponding issue between obesity and health problems and the limited access to affordable, healthy foods. The topics are similar considering they both agree on the relation of the lack of food availability to health problems for “low-income, low-access areas” (Corapi, 2014). Despite the fact that the articles focus on different perspectives of the controversy, a forward approach
…show more content…
Corapi (2014) concludes that “the problem may not lie solely with food accessibility; it could also be due to people’s shopping and eating habits.” Joe Cortright supports this with research, stating, “the opening of new, healthier supermarkets in neighborhoods has very little effect on what nearby residents eat” (2015). Now looking towards giving education and raising the awareness needed, the authors both reflect on what has been and what can be done. Cummins says his key message is that “they’re just not successful on their own”, “you need good health education programs that teach the skills needed for buying and cooking healthy foods” (Corapi, 2014). Providing evidence of what was previously done to help these families, Smirl (2011) includes that “the North End Food Security Network [approaches] the food needs of community members through” teaching cooking skills and food budgeting and nutritional education. Smirl suggests “using community kitchens and gardens to build skills using education…demonstrating that the involvement of community members themselves is critical in effectively combating” the social issue. This portrays that both authors agree that people need guidance when making shopping and behavioral changes in their …show more content…
Now to look at the big picture, “Why It Takes More Than a Grocery Store to Eliminate a ‘Food Desert’” by Sarah Corapi is a summary of a study of what happened when actions were taken upon this issue paired with an opinionated interview with Steve Cummins. He reveals what he found in the interview with Corapi (2014): people “think that things have gotten better in their neighborhoods, but haven’t necessarily turned their awareness into a change of behavior.” Cummins’ study suggests that “merely adding a grocery store to a neighborhood won’t be enough to motivate individuals to shop there for healthier foods” (Corapi, 2014). He includes opinions on education and awareness, but since his study only lasted for about six months, he cannot reflect on the outcome of educational initiatives. Ellen Smirl’s “Social Justice Deficits in The Local Food Movement: Local Food and Low-Income Realities” includes a lot of information on why this limited access and malnourishment problem came to be in the first place. In 2011, Smirl claims that “the current global food system…externalizes the cost of industrialized agriculture and places environmental degradation, resulting in social injustice [on the shoulders of citizens].” The blame is cast upon the government when Smirl proposes that “pressure must be brought to bear on the government to shift

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Since my last post, I have been thinking about alternate food desert perspectives. In the PBS article I found, Sarah Corapi lists the factors of ingrained eating and shopping habits throughout America. The article suggests these habits could explain the reason the national initiative to fight food deserts appears to be making little difference. Corapi summarizes the findings of a small scale study by Steven Cummins about why the accessibility of healthy food is not always a factor in shopping for it. Corapi states the study “suggests that merely adding a new grocery store to a neighborhood won’t be enough to motivate individuals to shop there for healthier foods.” Image Source My last source, from the Denver Post, analyzed the lack of supermarket presence in food deserts.…

    • 305 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Food Deserts: A Case Study

    • 1296 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Therefore, to solve the unhealthy food outcome there has to be a solution to add more supermarkets and grocery stores that can offer fresh healthy foods for the people living in a food desert community. “Researchers have found that individuals with limited or no access to supermarkets may have limited access to a wide variety of food options, healthful or other- wise, at reasonable cost, which could negatively impact health status” (Smith & Morton 2009). The occurrence of obesity among people of low-income can be clarified by better consumption inexpensive high calorie foods. Therefore, the fast food restaurants are convenient for many individuals that don’t have access to healthy foods. According to Block, Scribner & DeSalvo 2004, “that black and low-income populations have more convenient access to fast food.…

    • 1296 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “Despite the divided national debate about food choice vs. food access, the two camps are not diametrically opposed”, (Mcmillan pg 216). She is basing the reason for nutritional deficiency on choice as well. Furthermore, the article has a variety of reasons to why food shortages and people are nutritionally lacking. Tracie Mcmillan expands on the idea that people might have to nutrition in their neighborhoods and are making the conscious choice to not eat healthy. Obesity is talked about as an issue for some and maybe another problem those who are not eating right.…

    • 828 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Michael Pollan is critical of food processing and says it is “a source of society’s health problems” (508). Michael Pollan believes that it is because of the amounts of salt, sugar and fat those are put into foods that cause obesity. He also explains that restaurants and grocery stores came up with what they call “wholesome” foods that claim to be healthy but in reality are not. Pollan believes that one can solve this problem by replacing these foods “through public education and regulation-with fresh, unprocessed, local season real foods” (508). Freedman is critical of the views of Michael Pollan but agrees with restaurants that are trying to come up with ways to include healthier ingredients into their foods.…

    • 892 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Rhetorical Analysis of “Why it Takes More than a Grocery Store to Eliminate a Food Desert” Despite America’s great economic achievements there are still people who live in areas where an adequate food availability is scarce. Mrs. Sarah Corapi’s PBS article, “Why it Takes More than a Grocery Store to Eliminate a Food Desert”, is centered around the effects, or lack thereof, of placing a new grocery store in one of these very environments. The article, “Why it Takes More than a Grocery Store to Eliminate a Food Desert”, uses both ethos and logos to inform readers of the issue of food deserts and ways in which to improve them. In the article Mrs. Sarah Corapi interviews Professor Steven Cummins, the lead researcher in a study which was conducted…

    • 1067 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    For example Zinczenko expresses that “Fast-food companies are marketing to children a product with proven health hazards and no warning labels”. In cases like this one the authorities should intervene and protect the consumer from hazardous products that are offered in restaurant, grocery stores and even super markets. Also the food distribution companies should step up and assume some of the responsibilities of informing the consumer not just for health issues but also for the moral obligations to protect others. Some fast food restaurants can get away by not labeling some of the food that they provide because the laws are not strict enough as Zinczenko explains in his essay “Prepared food aren’t covered under Food and Drug Administration labeling laws”. Witch gives the fast food restaurants less responsibility over the worries of its consumer’s health.…

    • 809 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Food Desert Essay

    • 867 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Recommendations “Research suggests that neighborhood residents who have better access to supermarkets and limited access to convenient stores tend to have healthier diets and lower levels of obesity” (Larson, Story & Nelson, 2008), in addition to a better overall health. It is imperative that current food deserts and areas that are predicted to become a food desert consider interventions to help the community. To prevent further increase in the already prevalent health disparity, there must be change. One success story that is closely examined as a model for how to approach a food desert is a small rural town of West Virginia, that is located in the center of the Appalachian region. This town officially became a food desert when its only grocery store had to close, but the reaction of the town demonstrates…

    • 867 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Budiansky believes that locavore does not fully understand the sustainability of the industrial food chain, thus they do not make a wise decision. In his article Math lessons for locavores, he tried to inform the uninformed about the truth nature of the food innovation and explain the ambiguous terms of “sustainability and food miles” by pointing that food transported is just as sustainable as local food. His fact and opinion are mix together, it hard to tell where his data is and where is his opinion. Although his opinion are not back up firmly, he utilizes the logos and ethos very efficiently. His tone and language are very welcoming and easy to grasp.…

    • 1479 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    He also states that we have a problem over-eating so we should eat proportionally resulting in eating “Not too much.” Going back to what comes out of the ground Pollan explains we should eat “Mostly plants” because it is the healthiest and least processed food there is. In Mary Maxfield’s essay “Food is Thought: Resting the Moralization of Eating” she explains an age old theory on how to think about food. Her motto for the essay is “Trust yourself. Trust your body. Meet your needs.”(446) Maxfield believes that we have forgotten how to “trust ourselves” when it comes to eating because it seems that everyone wants to listen to the next get skinny quick idea.…

    • 2157 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Decent Essays

    With healthier school lunches, they are improving in school and staying out of trouble because they are having less sugar and more nutrients. Robert Paarlberg a political science professor at Wellesley College in his article “Attention Whole Foods Shoppers” argues that making food sustainable meaning, organic, local and slow is not the answer to world hunger. Paarlberg says that by consuming organic foods we are not helping the environment we are destroying it more. What or who should we believe? Although Paarlberg gives various reasonable arguments on how organic farming is worse for the world, Waters successfully makes a relation between healthy meals and learning how children…

    • 767 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays