Testimonies Of Ruby Bates And Mayella Ewell Relate?

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How Do the Testimonies of Ruby Bates and Mayella Ewell Relate? Rape is a nefarious act of forced sexual intercourse without the consent of the victim. Through her fictional characters and their false accusations of rape, Harper Lee explores racism and prejudice throughout her novel. Mayella Ewell in To Kill a Mockingbird accuses Tom Robinson, an innocent black man, of rape after she invited him into her house to help her break up a large piece of furniture. While, Ruby Bates, a poor white woman, accused the innocent Scottsboro Boys of group rape after she was hoboing on a freight train. Through accusations of rape and group rape, the testimony of Ruby Bates relates to that of Mayella Ewell. Because of the fear that her father’s beatings will …show more content…
Near the beginning of the article, Ransdell describes Bates’ attitude towards Price: “When I talked with her alone she showed resentment against the position into which Victoria had forced her, but did not seem to know what to do except to keep silent and let Victoria do the talking” (Ransdall). Hidden behind Victoria Price, Ruby Bates was incapable of speaking for herself during the trials. Rather than telling her own truth Bates went along with Price’s lies without anticipating the consequences. In turn Bates could have saved the lives of 8 boys, but her opportunity was taken from her. The author explains Ruby’s family and childhood in the second paragraph of the article: “Her father was a shiftless drunk who would beat her, her mother, and her siblings” (“Ruby”). Urgency for attention may have been a leading factor in her consent to lie in addition to the input of Victoria Price. The fact that her father abused and had no regard for her and her mother proves that she may enjoy the limelight. Both Mayella Ewell and Ruby Bates were pressured to accuse innocent black men of rape due to certain factors in their lives.
Throughout her testimony, Mayella does not seem to be confident about her answers. While answering Atticus’ question, in chapter 18 of To Kill a Mockingbird, Mayella is not clear with her words and hesitates : “No, I don’t recollect if he hit me. I mean yes I do, he hit me” (Lee 187). Logical inconsistencies in her version of the incident of the rape can be identified. Considering the fact that she does not “recollect” whether or not Robinson hit her, the reader is forced to question her

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