Test Bias In Children

1470 Words 6 Pages
Over time, with the development of the field of speech language pathology, there have been a variety of findings on the cause and effects of test bias within children from multicultural population, therefore leading to the implementations and improvement of various educational legislations which effect how special services such as speech is provided to individuals from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) populations. For example, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 has mandated that all assessment or test materials are not racially or culturally bias against various culturally and linguistically diverse populations (Taylor & Payne, 1983). Leading up to these laws were various court cases such as Larry R. versus Riles, …show more content…
More often than not, these students are not being challenged and are missing out on opportunities that could potentially benefit their post-secondary education. Ralabate (2007) stated that when a child is preforming below grade level, but show the potential to do better could potentially be an indication that the child may have been …show more content…
These four types of test bias include situational bias, bias in direction or format, value bias, and linguistic bias. Situational bias refers to the idea that pragmatic dimension of language includes both verbal and non-verbal language. Bias in direction or format refers to the form in which instructions for an assessment is provided. Value bias refers to the when a test item assumes a value system or approach that differs from the child who is being assessed (Roseberry-Mckibbin, 2013). Linguistic bias occurs when the language that is expected on an assessment various from that of the child who is being assessed (Roseberry-Mckibbin, 2013). Roseberry-Mckibbin (2013) also includes content bias as one of the bias that could potentially be observed during assessments with CLD populations. Content bias refers to the idea that the activities and the items presented to the child are not culturally or linguistically appropriate for the child being assessed based on their experience (Roseberry-Mckibbin,

Related Documents