Death Row In Just Mercy By Bryan Stevenson

Good Essays
In a world of cold blooded law enforcers who serve no justice when it comes to underage teens who get charged as an adult for a crime and put on death row, death row is a prison block or section for prisoners who will be sentenced to stay in prison till death. Without parole or sometimes even trial, and just from reading Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson explaining how the courts and the justice system is illicit. Mr. Stevenson talks about the circumstance that have led to the teens that have been slandered throughout their lives. The teens reached out to him in letters throughout their time in prison. I can say from reading the book Stevenson Steps in as a father figure-role model for these teens helping them fight their cases from unlawful lawyers, …show more content…
Like Henry Lee McCollum story on (eji.org) a 19-year-old who has been convicted of a crime who the police have no evidence. Henry was claimed to have murdered 11-year-old Sabrina Buie, who body was found in a field in Robeson County, North Carolina who was raped beaten with sticks an suffocated with her underwear in her mouth. The police interrogated him without a lawyer or a parent nearby making him feel disagreeable. Situations like this apprehending the first black man, somebody points you to and you take full advantage of the opportunity with no evidence is police brutality. Henry was intellectually disabled at the time he was arrested. Henry was later then sentenced to death in jail, which in my opinion isn’t fair because he has an illness and should be in a psychiatric hospital. A man of the Supreme Court justice by the name of Antonin Scalia cited his case or justification. While the case was still being held to prove Henry’s innocents (eji.org) states that “The 30-year delay in announcing McCollum 's innocence can be traced to prosecutors who illegally hid evidence, including a police request to test a fingerprint found at the crime scene against Roscoe Artis, a suspect who lived a block away from the scene and confessed to a rape and murder that happened within weeks of this crime. The test was not done, and prosecutors never told the defense that police had …show more content…
The innocent lives that have been taken with the approval of our own government should be enough to abolish capital punishment. Understanding Mr. Stevenson’s opinion, I have no choice but to agree 100 percent with what he said, he states that “incarceration became the answer to everything”(260), after spending millions of dollars lobbying state legislators to keep expanding the use of incarceration to respond to just about any problem. Those problems he states are drug addictions, poverty to have led someone to write a bad check, child behavioral disorders, even immigration issues (260). The death penalty is murder by the government, how can we continue to call our government fair if we do not hold it to the same rules we do it people? “What message do we send the American people, and other countries, for that matter, if we continue to be a ­nation that kills its citizens, a nation that enforces the most barbaric form of punishment” (eji.org)? As of 2012 2 percent of U.S. counties accounted for 56 percent of people under sentence of death, 52 percent of executions since 1976. Although death penalty laws are on the books 32 states a small minority of countries are responsible for the majority of the executions and the death row population in the United

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