Technology In The Wizard Of Oz

776 Words 4 Pages
The Wizard of Oz Dozens of advancements in movie producing technology occurred between the late 1920’s and the early 1960’s, this time period is often referred to as the Golden Age of Hollywood due to its unique style (Goldberg, “Classical Hollywood Cinema”). Many of America’s most revolutionary and memorable movies were created in this forty year period. The most popular and renown movies had unique qualities and specialties that set them apart from the others, these groundbreaking films often took advantage of the developing technology. The Wizard of Oz (1939) was one of the many the movies created in this time period and is often known for its exceptional use of Technicolor—the newest and most advanced coloring process of its time. The …show more content…
Frank Baum. It was produced by Mervyn LeRoy and directed by Victor Fleming among several other uncredited directors as he had to leave half way through filming the movie (“The Wizard of Oz”). The actors who played the munchkins also made filming the movie incredibly meticulous due to the constant problems that they caused. Lewis Panther, who researched the movie for its 75th anniversary wrote, “After the movie was finished, producer Mervyn LeRoy recalled: ‘They had orgies in the hotel and we had to have police on about every floor.’” This aspect of filming among many other things constantly strained everyone’s patience, yet it became one of Fleming’s most successful movies along with Gone with the Wind. Both movies gained immense popularity in America after being released to the public and to this day they are still regarded as classics (“Victor Fleming …show more content…
Because Technicolor is not a type of film and instead a process of modified filming, the cost of making a movie with Technicolor was tremendous. Ryan Lintelman describes the process as, “It [the movie studio] had to lease the [Technicolor] company 's unique movie cameras as well as a team of two experts to help operate the complicated machine.” Due to the extremely high cost of Technicolor, designers were encouraged to use as much color as possible to bring life into the movie. Unlike the standard black and white movies at the time, The Wizard of Oz (1939) has a vivid color scheme that catches the audiences’ attention and submerses them in a world of

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