Technology In Health Care

807 Words 4 Pages
Undoubtedly, technology is revolutionize the way healthcare organizations operate–bringing about a substantial efficiency to the industry as a whole. Although healthcare industry lags behinds in the adoption of technology to some degree, the provision of health care through the use of various technology is becoming a global reality. The lower cost, immediacy, and widespread availability of technology is changing the way patients receive care, making healthcare faster, cheaper and better than any time in the history our civilization. From the discovery of the X-ray by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen in 1895 to the invention of ultrasound and Magnetic resonance imaging, innovation is churning out new and very sophisticated technologies that is changing …show more content…
According to National Stroke Association (2014) “approximately 800,000 people experience a new or recurrent stroke”, which is equivalent to one stoke incident taking place every 40 seconds. Traditionally it takes thirty minutes to an hour for a stroke patient to be transported to a medical facility to receive appropriate medical attention. Unfortunately, by the time the patient reaches a nearby hospital, the patient has already lost a substantial amount of brain cells as they start to die off in large numbers immediately after the incident, leaving many patients with a permanent paralysis and severe disability that can interfere with their daily life. However, the recent development of mobile stroke unit, in which CT scanner and laboratory equipment essential for the diagnosis of stroke are mounted on to a specialized …show more content…
While both patients and doctors believe that technology can brings about fundamental changes to the way the industry provides healthcare as well as help alleviate the rising cost of healthcare by increasing efficiency of care delivery, there seems to be a vehement opposition coming from some provider who perceives technology as disruption to their traditional roles. As an intern at Providence Health & Services, I have witnessed this resistance firsthand during my internship. Since Providence adopted electronic healthcare record three years ago, there was vigorous organizational-wide effort to educate the staff on how to use the software in order to completely move from paper-based filing system to electronic filing system. While some staff embraced the change without difficulties, it seems that some physicians are uncomfortable with the idea of having to learn how to navigate through Epic, one of the most complicated software, thinking that it would interfere with their daily routine. Considering the fact that most physicians are inexperienced with technology or have had a proper training in medical school, it is going to be a tremendous challenge for healthcare organizations to bring the physician onboard without overburdening them with extra work on top of their busy

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