Invention Of Airpower

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Since the beginning of human confrontation, men used products of technology to confront each other in conflicts and wars. Invention of sward, bow and arrow, gunpowder and other further technological inventions changed wars throughout the history, but invention of an airplane changed it dramatically creating an airpower. When we look at the airpower today, we can define it as a use of all available relevant technology for commanders to use in air, space, and cyberspace. That definition is precisely emphasizing technology as main cause that gave birth of a unique military capability only airpower can provide; among others, to attack directly enemy targets from the air regardless of their location, and to observe from the air.1 Thus, if there …show more content…
Even if not recognized as a possible weapon at the beginning, on September 3 1914 French air patrol used airplane for observation of general Kluck’s army northeast of Paris. Information obtained from the air helped French forces to make Germans to withdraw thus proving airplane usefulness for military purposes.4 To the military this new technology, as a product of a new aeronautical science, opened up a new dimension of the air and received a powerful impetus to military and airpower development.5 Even the most conservative military experts saw its potential as a valuable mean for observation and reconnaissance. Moreover, usefulness of an airplane proved to be so valuable that the French military requested development of purpose-build …show more content…
Moreover, that attitude was so strong it finally led to the establishment of Royal Air Force (RAF). It was the first independent air force service born of technology, and technology dependent for the future development.10 Trenchard and other British airpower advocates, during the interwar years, theorized how to use new technologies in the possible future wars. In their minds, it was clear that next war would be the clash between fleets of thanks and aircraft. They strongly believed in aircraft as an offensive weapon, that brought fear to both soldiers and civilians, could end war in minutes. Thus, using a concept of strategic bombing in mass terror raids on enemy cities, for which they argued, can end the war before armies are mobilized.11
Therefore, it is necessary to say that technology had the most influence on Britain’s airpower development. Moreover, technology along with British experience influenced airpower development in the United States as well. MP3 US

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