Tasman Glacier Analysis

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Introduction
The Tasman Glacier is located in the heart of the Southern Alps, in the South Island of New Zealand. Tasman Glacier is New Zealand’s biggest glacier and therefore is an attraction. However, the Glacier has been retreating due to a number of processes which are operating. For example, between the years of 2000-2006, the Tasman Glacier had retreated at approximately 54 metres per year (Robert C. Dykes, Brook, & Winkler, 2010). The aim of this research was to gain an understanding as to why and how the Tasman Glacier is retreating, in relation to the processes that are operating in the environment. The use of aerial images and the aid of a stereoscope helped to achieve the aim, by allowing a close examination of the area, and giving
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The glacier can be identified from the key as the symbol of glacier ice. One of the main features is the lateral moraine. The lateral moraine is located around the outer edge of the glacier as well as south of the glacier, also positioned at the edge of Tasman Lake. Tasman Lake is a permanent lake as indicated by the key which runs from the terminal face of the glacier, southwards. At the south end of the lake lies an outwash plane, which also has a river running through which connects to the southern end of the Tasman Lake. To the west of the lateral moraine and Tasman Lake are alluvial fans. These features are located parallel to the glacier but however, only a select few are identified in Figure 1. However, on the east side of the glacier and lateral moraine a braided river is present, however figure 1 is incorrect, instead the symbol name should be braided river. The terminal moraine is also identified in Figure 1, displayed at the end of the glacier. Lastly, kettle lakes or supra-glacial lakes are also present on the surface of the glacier, however as seen in Figure 1, approximately three kettle lakes were …show more content…
As evident from the results the glacier has constantly been changing overtime from the year of 1986, in the form of retreat. The main process discussed in this report is calving, which is the main glacial process operating, and inevitably is causing the glacier to retreat.

References
Dykes, R. C., Brook, M. S., Robertson, C. M., & Fuller, I. C. (2011). Twenty-First Century Calving Retreat of Tasman Glacier, Southern Alps, New Zealand. Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, 43(1), 1-10. doi: 10.1657/1938-4246-43.1.1

Dykes, R. C., Brook, M. S., & Winkler, S. (2010). THE CONTEMPORARY RETREAT OF TASMAN GLACIER, SOUTHERN ALPS, NEW ZEALAND, AND THE EVOLUTION OF TASMAN PROGLACIAL LAKE SINCE AD 2000. Erdkunde, 64(2), 141-154.

Kirkbride, M. P. (1993). The temporal significance of transitions from melting to calving termini at glaciers in the central Southern Alps of New Zealand. The Holocene, 3(3), 232-240. doi: 10.1177/095968369300300305

Purdie, J., & Fitzharris, B. (1999). Processes and rates of ice loss at the terminus of Tasman Glacier, New Zealand. Global and Planetary Change, 22(1–4), 79-91. doi:

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