The Taijitu Symbols

1514 Words 7 Pages
The Taijitu symbol, more commonly known as “yin and yang” represents more than meets the eye. The symbol was partially derived from an ancient manual known as the I-Ching, or Book of Changes (Issitt and Main 251). Like many other symbols, this one was created by combining other symbols together to make a more present and relatable symbol. This symbol represents opposite forces and how they work together in the world. The “Yin and Yang” are a way for citizens to explain nature and how it balances itself out. It was decided that each half of the Taijitu would represent different forces. Yin, the black side, represents a negative force and is shown in darkness, coolness, the moon, and the shadows (Hopfe 198). Yang, the white side, would represent …show more content…
It is known as a hexagram, which is geometrically made from two triangles equal in size. Representation of this symbol depends on which religion or area it is used in. For the Jewish, it is a religious symbol. The Star of David was placed in newly built synagogues in the 19th century, and used on banners and prayer shawls (Liungman 301). This symbol is also believed by historians to be used as a form of art in ancient Egypt (Issitt and Main 26). In the art form, each triangle has a different meaning, like the “Yin and Yang”. Directionally speaking, the downward facing triangle represents water, whereas the upward facing triangle represents fire (Liungman 301). It is not a westernized symbol, although it can be found as a shape used for badges and is used for geometric equations in academic classes. Another way westerners have viewed this symbol is by comparing it to the Taijitu in the sense that fire and water are opposing forces that overpower one …show more content…
Through the symbol, it explains the five duties each Muslim should abide to. Not every Muslim is identified with the symbol due to the hazy origin, but they still follow the five pillars. The first pillar instills monotheism; the belief that there is only one god. The second is the belief in angels, or the belief that angels go to heaven and are assigned duties once their human lives are fulfilled. A belief in many prophets with one message, or third pillar, is the belief that God has chosen multiple men to relay the same message (Bishop and Darton 165). Next in the pillars, the day of judgement, is where God decides whether someone has fulfilled their rightful duties and whether they shall be rewarded or punished (Hopfe 399). Lastly, the fifth pillar, is the belief that God has timeless knowledge, or in other words knows everything. These five teachings are critical to Muslims, as without them, they wouldn’t have a set of rules to worship and follow. They are taught to obey by the five pillars and live life accordingly, and this symbol allows a visual representation of the set guidelines. Teachings within the religion coordinate with this symbol directly, like the Taijitu and unlike the Star of

Related Documents