Synthesis Paper On Teenage Pregnancy

2408 Words 10 Pages
This newspaper article, written by editor and author Susan Perry, primarily focused on how in "areas of the country where '16 and Pregnant ' was most popular, teenage births fell the fastest after the show was launched". Though not as pertinent to the nature of my synthesis paper as other sources I cited, Perry 's piece begins with context relating to the the effects of teenage pregnancy on annual emolument. Perry 's research unearths that the "average earnings of a teenage parent for each of the first fifteen years after their baby is born is just under $6,500". This source will contribute to drawing connections between her research and conclusions made in Diaz 's studies. Perry 's prelude into the principal subject of her article has background …show more content…
The first passage zeroes in on the heart of the problem I intend to address in my synthesis paper, the causes of teenage pregnancy. The topic of discussion in the second passage is the impact of teenage pregnancy on teenage parents. The third and final passage revolves around existing solutions for the issues mentioned in the first and second passages and explores tactics that must be applied in order to combat teenage pregnancy. This source is succinct but imperative to my synthesis paper. I can involve evidence from this source in in discourse of teenage pregnancy matters relating to issues with education and monetary security. Similarly to the NCSL Postcard, this article aided me in better understanding how the by-products of teenage pregnancy are just as adverse as the product of a teenage pregnancy itself, an unplanned baby. Although brief and lacking in depth evaluation on the material mentioned, the source works as the simple basis on which I can construct my argument …show more content…
Though the source is not as contemporary as my other sources cited, his article contains the raw, unfiltered content I need to give my synthesis paper the emotionally-stirring points necessary to drive my paper in a direction that would appeal to the condolences of readers. He unapologetically underlines how suicide rates amongst teenagers mothers are seven times higher than that of non-parent teenagers, a truly disheartening truth that often goes unmentioned when reflecting on the effects of teenage pregnancy. Moreover, his article contained shocking, but unfeigned, truths about the rate of teenage pregnancy in the United States in collation to the rest of the world. I can include the hyperbole-like facts in my narration paragraph to seize the interest of readers and encourage them to continue reading. One such example of an interest-sparking point is that the teenage birthrate in the U.S. is almost twice as that of Great Britain, Canada, and France. Evidence used from Turbak 's article is a double-edged sword, practical in divulging serious facts and in maintaining the reader 's appetite for more to peruse. I can use his article in particular to reinstate my stance that yes, readily available birth control for teenagers is a wise idea, as the ideal approach to the question, "should teenagers have easy access to birth control?" This source

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