Syntax And Diction In The Narrative Of Edgar Allen Poe

Improved Essays
Register to read the introduction… This idea is expanded upon in the third sentence as Poe use specific styles of syntax to illustrate his own disbelief. Two styles are seen when he states "Yet, mad am I not- and surely do I not dream". Poe constructs the wording of this sentence backwards- instead of I am not mad, it's mad am I not- showing a contradiction to what the sentence says. Wording the sentence backwards makes the reader think the opposite of what the sentence actually says; he is mad, he is dreaming. Signs of disbelief are again shown by this unique sentence structuring for when you read the sentence, it sounds more like a question than a statement- do I not dream? Poe's use of syntax and diction continues on as he illustrates how his unbelievable horrors might just seem normal to a more ‘calm and logical person'. The whole style of the passage, although showing the contradiction of Poe saying the narrative to be horrific to him stating that it might be "baroque" to normal people, gives the reader a feel that Poe isn't normal. This whole style of writing the passage captures the reader's attention in the beginning but settles them down at the end with logical …show more content…
The first line gives an image of something that is unbelievable and horrible. The following sentences makes Poe look like a mental case for he's experienced events that even his "senses reject evidence"; he doesn't even know if he is mad or if he is dreaming; evidence of his past is a blur, and it makes the reader view him as a trauma case; someone that is not normal. Although the images of Poe being mental and abnormal stays, his is demystified a bit when he presents logic in saying that others might not see his experiences as being so horrible. The crazy images settle down a bit towards the end of the passage, setting the reader up for the idea that he is not a normal person (which will soon help in his

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Tell Tale Identity Essay

    • 785 Words
    • 4 Pages

    All of this repetition and italicisation further implicates the narrator as unstable and having a weak mental state further adding to the construction of identity by the narrator in this text. And this is important as writing in this way allows Poe to interact in a more personal way with his readers, making them feel as though they are observing the actions within the story first-hand and having them explained to them by the narrator as they read. But the narrator’s explanations are weak and their theory unsound, the events occurring within the story are described fairly truthfully by the…

    • 785 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    I would say that these similarities lend themselves useful to the authors in the perpetuation of the narrators’ mental instabilities. As I said in the beginning, some authors have no experience with mental illness and therefor are unable to accurately describe the escalating process without seeming overly exaggerated or unrealistic. This gives Poe and Gilman the upper hand. They are able to give their characters and stories the verisimilitude that readers desire. Madness in both stories is a thematic element, in which the narrator is put in a circumstance that accelerates the psychotic until the character is forced to act upon their nervous tendencies.…

    • 1961 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    His “disease had sharpened [his] … senses” (Poe) and was beginning to cause him to go insane. By constantly talking about his senses, it gives subtle hints that the senses will have something to do with the story. He asks in the beginning why the reader’s would say that he is mad, however, later proceeds to give reasons as to why he is insane. When he says that he can “calmly ……

    • 1041 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    ( Poe 110)” A person with average intelligence would see that Montresor’s reply is hinting towards his hidden agenda; however this is simply disregarded by Fortunato. Because of Fortunato’s overall gullibility within the story, from his intoxication or otherwise, one can easily predict that Poe decided to dress Fortunato in a traditionally foolish gown to be representative of his foolish…

    • 818 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the story, the narrator’s wisdom is certainly being questioned. "Reasonable soundness and Insanity" from the primary line of the story exhibit his rational soundness was the fundamental component that was making him insane. (Poe) Thus, the mind is particularly the narrator’s interchange of feelings, a mixture of reality and dreams and its ultimate mystery which indicates unreliability. The activities of the storyteller, joined with his request that he isn't mad, lead readers to establish that he had experienced the ill effects of some mental issue; in any case, it has been proposed that it isn't the central idea to go but the type of his “madness that is of importance to the story”. (Quinn…

    • 1086 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In the story, the reader is introduced to an unnamed narrator who is writing about how he got to this low point. He blames most of his downfall on things that he thinks he has no control over such as alcohol. His sanity is something that must be proven, and with Poe’s use of the first person narrative we see it become possible. Edgar Allen Poe uses first person point of view to help the reader further understand the narrator’s decline into insanity. In the story, readers are allowed to see into the mind of the unnamed narrator through the use of first person narration which is ultimately how he is proven as unreliable.…

    • 1143 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Poe’s usage of literacy devices such as symbolism and point of view bring the story to life enhancing the madness the narrator portrays along with the dramatic effects. Throughout the story, the narrator is concisely claiming that he is not a madman, but that many perceive him to be. “Madmen know nothing. But you should have seen me. You should have seen how wisely I proceeded-with what caution…” (p.92).…

    • 1490 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In Poe’s short stories, the narration is in the first person. While this adds an interesting perspective, one cannot always trust the narrator’s recollection. Poe often utilized a narrator who wasn’t credible or accurate with his narration. To create an unreliable narrator, Poe integrates hubris and insanity into his characters and selectively omits details. Firstly, Poe integrates insanity into his stories to…

    • 1017 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Edgar Allan Poe allows his readers to examine the characters with his use of an unreliable narrator, the theme of the story, and his unique approach on the lack of character development. Poe’s short story begins with a conversation, and it persuades the reader to continue with the tale. Although, the explanation towards the narrator’s sanity is debatable. The narrators starts feeling a sense of injustice and starts getting agitated.…

    • 2198 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    However, Poe allows the narrator to tell the story in a playful tone whereas is obvious at some points that the narrator is quite frantic. The narrator claims that the disease that he has "sharpened his senses" (Poe). The alterations in the man 's normal senses leaves the readers with openness to assume that the narrator could have suffered from psychological distress and that his emotions were a motivating force in the murder. However, the narrator’s senses were sharpened and not impaired. At the beginning of the story, the narrator tranquilly narrates the audience through his venture.…

    • 758 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays