Sympathy Toward The Monster In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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“His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black…” This quote from Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein, describes the monster that Victor Frankenstein creates on his own. Although the monster is portrayed with fear and horror, Shelly writes on the monster’s actions in a way that makes readers feel sympathetic towards him. Throughout the novel, readers tend to feel compassion towards the monster because of the way Victor abandons him and his isolation from society. Shelley describes the monster as a terrifying creature to even glance at. Initially, readers believe that this monster will cause harm to all in the novel, without even knowing about his interior being. Similarly, as soon …show more content…
When the monster “stays” with the cottagers, he feels a connection with them and may even feel compassion towards them. The monster states, “ I am now going to claim the protection of some friends, whom I sincerely love, and of whose favour I have some hopes.” Although the monster was too afraid to show himself in front of the cottagers, he acquires a love for them just by observing their love for each other. Here, Shelley does not depict the monster as a malicious figure, but, rather a sensitive being in need of empathy. Once the monster decided to meet the cottagers, he was afraid of what might happen to him: “ I am full of fears; for if I fail there, I am an outcast in the world for ever.” Already the monster knows that if the most amiable people he has met cannot even stand to look at him, then no one can. After the cottagers throw him out, he becomes vicious. This evilness portrayed by the monster can be understood by readers because all he wants is a companion, but Frankenstein fails to create him one. Now, readers view Frankenstein as “the monster” because he is refusing happiness to an innocent creature. Once again, Shelley discreetly has readers feel more sympathetic towards the monster, who is supposed to be the evil character in the

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