Analysis Of Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus By Mary Shelley

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Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus, a gothic romantic novel written by Mary Shelley in 1817 as a horror story to win a contest between her husband, Percy Shelley and their friend Lord Byron and published in 1818, is about a scientist named Victor Frankenstein, who in his attempt to be God, wants to create a new species of human but soon learns from losing his brother, best friend and wife to his creation, that this endeavor for glory was not as he expected. The focus of this paper is if the Mary Shelley had described the Creature as an eloquent person and able to fully communicate by using fully formed sentences and arguments, does this fact help the reader by making what Mary Shelly wrote about the Creature make him easier to sympathize …show more content…
When they, the De Laceys are visited by Safie, and Felix starts to teach her the language, the Creature’s natural kindness is shown as he turns away with disgust at the horror and bloodshed of the story “Ruins of Empires”. He begins to toy with the question of ‘what was I? Comparing his self to Adam in Paradise Lost by John Milton, cast out of society by a mere mistake not made by him but by another. Advancing in his ability to learn the language, he finally deciphers the notes in his pocket as they are Victor’s notes on his creation. It becomes obvious that Victor has loathed his creation from the beginning and rejected it completely; this is confirmed when the Creature sees a father lift his daughter loving up into the air; it shows that we see how loving the man was to his child, but Victor did not want to take responsibility after creating him and ran. This passage confirms that the Creature does have feelings not just for himself but for others as well and helps the reader see him as more vulnerable and emotional instead of the evil monster Victor makes him out to …show more content…
His complete innocence in the beginning of his life reminds of a newborn. When he first came to life he “muttered some inarticulate sounds”, then he smiled “a grin wrinkled his cheeks.” (Shelley). But when he reached out to Victor, he reacts badly, as if someone rejects us we feel vulnerable. Later his speech changes to “all men hate the wretched!” As Victor is yelling that he should never had created him in the first place. Those words create the feeling that the Creature knows that he is rejected by society. His speech is almost poetic in the fact that you cannot help but to feel compassion for this Creature. His desire to live is polluted by the crimes he commited to get his ‘father’s’ attention and love. Mary Shelley has enabled the reader to look past the murders of William, Henry, and Elizabeth to see a Creature who only wanted acceptance from his ‘father’ but received nothing but hatred, utter rejection and loathing. His change from innocence to this vengeful monster was not of his own accord but because of the reception he received from society. The concept that people should not judge a book by its cover rings true. The contrast between the warm settings where Victor is surrounded by friends and family no matter the situation to the Creature’s cold and desolate scenery in the

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