Symbols Of Women In F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

1328 Words 6 Pages
Feminism, curiosity, and fear are three grand symbols that depict the women of the 1920s; Women that were just as just as fearful to break the conventional behavior and just as anxious to tear off the Victorian-shackles and explore their newly established gender freedom. The Great Gatsby captures all of these symbols successfully while still presenting a tragic love story. F. Scotts Fitzgerald, author of The Great Gatsby, fabricates the story of a long lost romance con-stantly changing back and forth from present and past tense. Throughout the story the women in the novel are presented in such a forcefully-docile way that one begins to notice that their evolv-ing role in the 1920s society isn’t essentially wanted by the opposite sex. Three …show more content…
This showing how although Daisy and Myrtle are entirely compelled to act how their husbands chose, Jordan is a little more liberal but all nonetheless still essentially trapped. Myrtle and Daisy are beyond unhappy; Jordan is less constrained because she’s out and about dating, partying, but still being told by a guy at a party that she can’t be seen with a poor man. “The winning of female suffrage did not mark the end of prejudice and discrim-ination against women in public life” (Perry 36). The social culture and morals of a woman during the 1920’s varied immensely. The Roaring 20s were when the Flappers, “independent and rebellious” (Banner 578) came out to play. Flappers emerged because there was a loss of biblical authority and a general decline in traditional morals in the United States. However, even though there was such a heavy aura of feminism that masked the era, underneath that mask were the many men that were most definitely not ready to leave the Victorian life style that made them superior to the women. Flappers were similar to Jordan Baker in the sense that both were inde-pendent and free-spirited; Jordan was able to party with multiple men, dance with whomever she liked, dress however she liked, and ultimately was in control of herself in every …show more content…
One of the biggest classic gender roles were that the men were the ones that worked, made the important decisions, made the money and controlled everything, and vice versa the women were the ones that weren’t allowed to work, had to stay home to cook, clean, and take care of the children. The Buchanan household followed that life-style; Tom handles everything and Daisy lounges around lost in her past romance, forever being in bitter reminiscence. Myrtle Wilson and George Wilson are under the same circumstances are Tom and Daisy, but Myrtle and George serve as a colossal foil to the Buchanans. The Wilsons living in the depressing Valley of Ashes, financially pathetic and their lifestyle endlessly less glamourous than the Buchanans. Myrtle and Daisy are both married to men that are most defi-nitely not conforming to the changes in the way women were now acting, both were held down by their husbands and both were unhappy. Jordan on the other hand was working, a golf champi-on, partying, and all around blooming the 1920s aura, but even then still being talked down to by other men at parties. George and Tom were part of the husbands that liked to see themselves just have that much more power over someone, even if it just so happened to be their wife.

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