Symbols In To Kill A Mocking Bird

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Symbolism in To Kill a Mocking Bird Whether it be in literature or even shown in pictures, people use things to represent something with a deeper meaning and that’s called symbolism. In the book “To Kill a Mockingbird” by author Harper Lee, various different themes or symbols are active throughout the book all directly or in some way being tied to the ultimate theme of the book, which is not being able to understand someone until you experience life from their point of view. The most apparent reoccurring theme though is equality because of the fact it’s symbolized through people, birds, and even inanimate objects that Scout and Jem encounter over the course of the book in the tree that turns out to play a bigger part of the story as the …show more content…
You’re not alone as a man by the name of Tom Robinson is going through a very similar situation and even though his situation as a whole might not have gone ideally, your situation doesn’t necessarily need to possess the same ending as his. He is an individual in society singled out just because of the fact that he is a black man who just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. You could infer that in To Kill a Mockingbird, the society believes that white people are a symbol of the best of people while the black people is a symbol of the worst of people. Neither of which is true because no one person is one-hundred percent honorable or evil, but no one is able to believe otherwise and see that every person is Maycomb is equipollent. Atticus feels misunderstood and even similar to Tom you could say because of the fact he’s fighting a battle very few people even understand why he’s trying to win it. All in all, Tom was more or less being discriminated against for looking past the label to fortify what's right, which …show more content…
What matters is the part we choose to act on.” What that quote is more or less endeavoring to verbalize that we’re all capable of doing the right thing just as we are the wrong one and that it’s up to us to decipher which one is worth pursuing. In the book “To Kill a Mockingbird” written by Harper Lee written in 1960, there’s obviously an abundance prejudice that many people in that book are facing, whether it be skin color or even aurally perceived from other people like Boo Radley for example. The question is why that continues to influence the entire town’s opinions of him, Tom Robinson, and even supposed town drunk, Dolphus Raymond, whom we meet outside the courtroom when the kids rush out to comfort Dill’s distraught self. It is in that moment that Scout questions why he pretends to be something he’s not and his capability to change the cycle that they’re all a part of that only confuses young Scout even more than before. In the book, we come across the snowman that Scout and Jem build on the first day it has snowed in Macomb for ages, but in reality, the snowman could easily represent the fact that underneath, we’re all the same kind of people. As the book progresses, Scout seems to grasp the concept more when she says, “‘…there’s only one kind of folks. Folks,’” (227). According Symbolism in to Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee is saying that equality is

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