Symbols In The Kite Runner

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Kite Runner
In a novel, the use of symbols provide meaning to the text beyond what is actually said to enhance the story. The novel, “The Kite Runner,” by Khaled Hosseini, is an excellent example of implementing key symbols that explains the main points and themes the author is trying to get across. In “The Kite Runner”, the kite symbolizes the worthiness Amir desires from his dad, the guilt and self hate Amir has for the rest of his life due to the betrayal of his loyal friend, and the sense of hope and redemption that life can get better one flake at a time.

Amir wanted to follow his father 's footsteps, and by winning the kite flying tournament he would finally have the opportunity to redeem himself for what he did to Baba by killing
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This quote is an excellent example of how symbolism is shown in the story. In the beginning of the book, the kite is symbolised as a chance for Amir to prove their worthiness to his father. This is the first time the kites are represented as a gateway to his father’s true love something he was never able to experience. To further extend on the fact Amir wanted to win the trophy he also felt guilty for killing his mother and believes he may finally be pardoned by becoming victorious. Amir had a vision of him winning the tournament, he says, "I had a mission now… I wasn 't going to fail Baba… All I smelled was victory. " Besides the fact Amir wanted his sins to be pardoned, the main thought that was going through his head, was to win the championship. All Amir craved was obtaining the trophy. For Amir victory was the only gateway for forgiveness by his father.

True friendship comes at a price, and the kite now symbolises how Hassan is willing to do anything and suffer for his friend, while Amir chooses to do nothing and hide. Amir has to face the consequence of betraying his friend with guilt and self hate for the rest of his wretched life. Amir disappointed, and frustrated says

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