Symbolism In The Farmworker In Los Vendidos By Valdez

1058 Words 5 Pages
Exaggeration of stereotypes can be the most powerful way to symbolize the impact of misrepresentation.Having each character be a symbol of the different stereotypes sprung upon by society, revealing the Hispanic perception of what makes a “good” Mexican in America. The satirical tone used in the play helps reveal anxieties of being a Mexican-American in the world they live in, appealing not only to mexicans but also Americans as well, in the pressures they face being in an Anglo culture. By Valdez using this method he allows one to not only analyze but at the same time comprehend the prejudices they may very well hold against them. He references them to robots, as society looks at them, suggesting they are just people do who the labor that …show more content…
Valdez describes him as hardworking “But his most attractive feature is that he’s hard-working”(42), but to Jimenez hard workers aren’t enough, showing the start to the discrimination the farmworker faced. Jimenez is mostly concerned with the appearance of the farmworker “.. We are looking for someone suave...but of course not too dark”(42), showing how the government looks at mexicans, they are “not good enough” for Reagan’s political purpose, so they are rejected by Miss JIM-enez. By doing so shows the only way to successfully survive in Anglo culture is to become an assimilated “sellout.” Adding to the American way of only accepting other cultures by judging others not on who they are as a person but ability to assimilate to the “American way.”Johnny his quality of life living on the margin (low quality, little power, …show more content…
The next robot presented, a more urban one as Jimenez desires, is Johnny Pacho. Pacho shows another side to the Mexican stereotype, the urban, lazy, gangster Mexican. He is sleek. Pancho is the ultimate contrast, “Anything and everything necessary for city life. For instance, survival: he knife fights. (Snaps. JOHNNY pulls out a switchblade and swings at SECRETARY. SECRETARY screams.) He dances. (Snap.)” (44). Johnny can dance yet will be involved in knife fight, can sing, but also uses a profound amount of vulgar language. He commits crimes but is an scapegoat for any crime he didn’t commit. Valdez then goes on to compare Pacho to a low rider car, painting an image of the person he is in the American eyes. While the farmworker portrays the common hard working, loyal laborer seeking employment in the American workplace, the fields, Pacho portrays the image of a Mexican- American that had failed to conform to the assimilated “sell out” image thrusted upon by Americans. He is the assimilation gone wrong. Going past the request of Jimenez, Valdez’s point indicates that Pachucos is therefore, showing that this is only way to successfully survive in Anglo

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