Symbolism In Of Mice And Men

1836 Words 8 Pages
The American Dream: Of Mice and Men John Steinbeck's work, Of Mice and Men, is a vivid depiction of The American Dream, where the desire for an unknown fate lies within a harsh reality. The use of striking imagery in Of Mice and Men contributes to the thematic focus around the American Dream. Steinbeck utilizes symbolism and motifs to convey the reality the characters face while on their journey to an unsettling future...their American Dream. Of Mice and Men takes place in a powerful, symbolic setting. The opening depiction of the isolated spot in the forest by the pool is the simple world of Nature; the bunkhouse is the dreary home of exhausted workers trying to gain insight and comfort for their future; Crook's bunk, the harness room, …show more content…
"Lennie- if you jus’ happen….(Steinbeck, 15); "So you forgot...." (Steinbeck, 4); “Poor bastard” (Steinbeck, 8). The motifs included foreshadow future events in the novel which the characters will face. The ultimate downfall of the characters is revealed through the use of motifs Steinbeck utilizes. “Poor bastard” (Steinbeck, 8), applies to Lennie as George is watching over this giant “baby”, this symbolizes the hardship they will both continue to face on their journey to their dream farm. However, towards the end of the book when Curley’s wife is murdered, Candy speaks of the “Poor bastard” once more....George's bond with Lennie causes him to make a rash decision to not buy the farm with Candy....this is a noble yet irrational move for George. The tragedy behind the book inspires the decision of not moving fourth with their dream, however, this decision will forever imbed in the lives of George and Candy. George and Candy will continue to have to survive in the harsh ranch, when they could have settled in a much better life. Candy's "Poor bastard" this time applies to George, whom we leave alone, with the dead Lennie, at the end of the play. …show more content…
Steinbeck takes the roles of these characters to the ultimate degree with the multiple tragedies in the novel. Lennie and George’s reality is set in stone with the death of Lennie; George comes to realize that the dream of their farm, will never happen. George deeply makes a connections with Lennie as it pains him without Lennie by his side. Once Lennie is dead George can still pursue the dream of the farm with Candy, However, George does not continue the dream that they had with each other. Instead, he will have to deal with the cruel and unsettling fact that he killed his best friend. George will also have to suffer working in the harsh conditions as he is now, on the ranch, for the rest of his life, with the guilt and sorrow felt towards Lennie. Essentially George faces the fact that the dream of living on the farm was for himself and Lennie only. George opts out of the better life because without Lennie the dream disappears. With the death of his dog, Candy seems to realize the loneliness of his position without the old dog. The bond between the two characters shows the connection of the harsh reality of living on a ranch. Candy becomes very vulnerable and stays in a position of introversion. He keeps to himself and stays alone on the ranch despite the search for Lennie. He is ultimately deserted by everyone as no one thinks twice about the old man. Candy's

Related Documents