Symbolism In Lord Of The Flies Essay

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There are a plethora of symbols that represent the savagery and the darkness of man. The scar is a symbol of destruction. This shows that man will always have his savage nature. The beautiful paradise, the island, is ruined just because of the arrival of man. The painted masks on the Hunters prove that there is a movement from civilization to savagery. As the Hunters paint their faces, the last bits of their civilized nature goes away. Their faces without the mask represents the civil part of man while the paint shows our true nature. Piggy’s broken glasses also symbolizes the movement from civilization to savagery. The glasses represent technology and intelligence. There is technology and intelligence where there is civilized human beings. The glasses breaking symbolizes the loss of civilization. Overall, the symbols that Golding uses throughout the novel provide basis on the savagery and darkness of man. …show more content…
Roger is the savagery of human beings that is being restrained by other things. In the starting of the novel, Roger throws rocks at the littluns, but he never has an intent because he fears punishment. Later in the novel, he shows the true darkness of human beings when he attempts to kill Ralph without hesitation. Jack shows the slow regression of humans when they are put into situations that is beyond their capacities to control. Jack, at first, tries to keep order in the community as he instructs the choir boys to do things that are more civilized than what he asks them to do later in the book. As his hatred for Ralph grows, the savage inside of him is shown. The Lord of the Flies is the darkness in every human being. Although it is not real, it is a part of everyone’s imagination that makes it so dark. Even Simon falls victim toward the darkness of the Lord of the Flies. The use of different traits in every character comparing the two sides of

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