Symbolism In Hesiod's Theogony

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We are first introduced to Hesiod's Prometheus in his Theogony written presumably around 700 BC. He is the son of Iapetus and Clymene and although he is regarded as a God, Prometheus is a titan whose name means "forethought". Said to be responsible for sculpting mankind from clay Prometheus's debut begins during the war against the Titans and Gods where he takes Zeus's side aiding Zeus in his victory. With all the Titans defeated and punishment commencing Zeus showed favor towards Prometheus who had fought by his side allowing him to evade Tartaros. We later find this favor wearing thin when the gods and man meet at Mekone. According to Hesiod (700 BC) writer of the Theogony, "Prometheus boldly divided a great ox and laid it out, thinking to …show more content…
Sought after as an ally to the humans Prometheus stole back the fire from Zeus angering him even further. As punishment for his actions, Zeus had the Titan chained to a rock where an eagle was sent to eat his liver every morning. Because of his immortal qualities, this caused tremendous pain but in the evening the liver grew back only to be consumed once again by the eagle in the morning. However, another source explains that Zeus's fury did not stop there. According to Aron J Astma writer of "PROMETHEUS" on the Theoi Project, Zeus had Hephaestus create Pandora who became a deliverer of tragedy to mankind and gave her as a gift to one of Prometheus's brother Epimetheus. Pandora was given a box that she was told not to open but curiosity got the best of her. She opened the box and unleashed sickness, jealousy, famine, among other things to mankind. Trapped inside that box once she had closed it was hope. Although mankind has yet to be saved from the contents of Pandora's box Prometheus was saved from his torment by Hercules some years …show more content…
He is known as the Trickster God or God of Mischief and Chaos. The clever giant was given the gift of shapeshifting and can be found causing trouble in Asgard among the gods and goddesses that live there. Writers say he shows no concern, or a lack of, for the wellbeing of his fellow gods and will often bring danger to someone to save them, in turn, making himself look like a hero. Other sources say that Loki is a coward only out for his own pleasure and self-preservation. This motif presents itself repeatedly in stories such as "Loki's Children and the Binding of Fenrir" and "Loki's Flyting." One of the most notable beings "The Theft of Idun's Apples" where Loki finds himself at the mercy of a giant called Thiazi who threatens his life if he does not give him Idun, the keeper of the apples of immortality. It had taken Loki seven days just to find Idun and when he did it was not by force that he got her to Thiazi who lets Loki free. He used his cunningness to trick Idun into believing that beyond the Bifrost there was a tree that bore golden apples. Upon returning to Asgard finds himself faced yet again with death as the gods forewarn Loki if he does not bring Idun back he will be killed because not only did he commit this kidnapping he has taken away the god's source of immortality and they are

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