What Does Burris Ewell Symbolize In To Kill A Mockingbird

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Racism is like a mockingbird, it mimics other people. Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird uses many literary terms such as symbolism to get her message out. In the 1930’s The Great Depression was not only going on in the town of Maycomb County, Alabama. Scout Finch, her brother Jem, and their friend Dill go on many adventures that do not only lead them to learning new things about their town, but valuable lessons of life. Like most books there are movies, however they are not always the same; two years after the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird was written Robert Mulligan directed the movie. One principle in the book was when Scout met Burris Ewell on the first day of school. Burris Ewell immediately gave away the impression that he …show more content…
Aunt Alexandra is always looking out for Scout, whether it is what she is wearing or what is coming out of her mouth. Scout explains how Aunt Alexandra makes her dress like a young lady, “...She said I wasn’t suppose to be doing things that require pants” (Lee 108). Scout was referring to Aunt Alexandra. This scene is continuously being presented throughout the book, just in different ways. This is important because it shows that Aunt Alexandra is trying to teach Scout to be a better “woman.” However, Aunt Alexandra is not there to show gender stereotyping against Scout. This is different in the movie because the viewers have no insight on the Finch’s outside family members, also leaving Scout with no tolerance on becoming “lady-like.” This was an important essential in the book that was missing in the movie. In the end, Scout does not learn to become polite, not to say bad words, dress properly, and to be respectful to her elders and peers. None of the viewers got the feeling of the harsh tolerance and stereotypical comments towards …show more content…
Scenes like Scout’s first day at school, the Finch children going to Cal’s all black church, and Aunt Alexandra being a character affected the book considerably. Despite the differences in each version, the theme to never be prejudice towards one is mentioned throughout both the movie and book. One can take away from this that killing and ruling Tom Robinson guilty of rape was only because he was black, this symbolizes “killing a mockingbird.” Overall, the book was intriguing to read and the movie was amazing to watch, there were just a couple points altered, but typically the town was still full of

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