Cain: A Mystery Lord Bryon Analysis

Good Essays
In the story Cain: A Mystery by Lord Bryon, Bryon creates the character Cain as a suffering eldest brother of Abel and son of Adam and Eve with the many complications of his own thoughts. This character is a key aspect of the author’s purpose. The author wants the readers to understand that your own thoughts impact the world around you when put into action. Your world, meaning not only yourself, but others and your environment. Within this action, your own world can be weakened or strengthened. The author implements his idea through Cain’s character and the setting around him. In Act 1 of the story, the author explains how one’s thoughts are interpreted. For example, from the act, “…tis your immortal past which speaks within you” explains how our internal thoughts impact our morals. With Cain’s emotions of God that are highly different from his parents, the author uses him to show how his past and current suffering of his internal pain are affecting his own world. Cain is questioning God’s word and how death occurs. Lucifer is introduced in this section as a godlike figure in Cain’s world who challenges Cain’s thoughts. Lucifer tells Cain, “Existence- it will cease-and thou wilt be”. This shows how one’s true existence will be within you and thus, being seen in society. This quote symbolizes one’s mental thoughts that …show more content…
Because of Cain’s character’s suffering and uncontrollable actions, we as readers, can understand how these acts affected his world negatively. The mystery is how his murderous act will affect his world in the future. We can also interpret that the author wants the reader to think freely but keep to one’s self when needed. This lesson can be learned from Cain displaying his views of God to his faithful family. Thus, the author achieves this message using the characters emotions expressed through dialogue and the dynamics of his

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    In the Year 1652 John Milton went completely blind while trying to write an epic poem that would justify the ways of God to men. The action of writing Paradise Lost was a desperate attempt to draw people back to God as they began to flock towards science. In this attempt Milton tried to explain why God would allow evil to exist, and harm his people. Despite Milton’s efforts to paint God in a good light the readers of his poem have interpreted his writing in several different ways. Some who study Milton create the opinion that God is a cold, merciless, and wicked thing that man created.…

    • 873 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Noah is motivated by an external drive that accounts for society influences. For example, going up against God’s challenge to please him while saving his family, preserving future generations, and dealing with environment factors of a horrific flood signifies Noah’s fight against societal challenges that are brought his way. If he fails humanity’s blame is on his shoulders, which he must endure while the “eyes” of God look down upon him with contempt. On the other hand, Gilgamesh is influenced by an…

    • 1965 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    He was presented in the story, from the start, to disagree with his society. Rather, this is a voice for his society; that they should not allow someone to form their ideas and beliefs. Religion is a major aspect in today’s society, and by Huxley introducing John to serve as the “black sheep” in this civilization, Huxley is using John as a guide. John is rule breaking consistently. He countermeasures those in charge, and even commits suicide towards the end of the story.…

    • 912 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    He argues that Satan’s need for material things is based off of his fall, because when he fell from heaven, he “hardened”, therefore, he is in search of having “hardened” items in his possession to feel powerful, rather than simply returning to God and asking for his forgiveness. Satan losing his aspects of a spiritual being awakened his desire for secular possessions. Dobranski continually argues that Satan…

    • 1382 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Suffering And Suffering

    • 1092 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Suffering is in the world all around us, it is a fact of life (2) and it can teach us many things that help us to become better human beings. People often blame God for all of the pain and tragedy in the world; if we are going to learn from suffering and allow it to teach us about the world whilst remaining faithful to God, we must understand that God created a good world and good human beings, His creation has been infected by the introduction of sin, which resulted in the creation of evil and suffering (4). Man was given the option to accept or reject God, Man chose to reject and that is what has caused him to sin and therefore create suffering (5). Part of learning about the world is understanding that people are not perfect, we learn this…

    • 1092 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Edwards seeks to explain that there is an angry omnipotent God who wishes to punish any human that does not something wrong. He uses vivid descriptions to paint a picture of the hellish afterlife that awaits them. Equiano on the other hand, gives a historical account of his life, turning to God to thank him for protecting him when he needed protection, and offering praise to God for doing something good for him. Though Equiano does not paint vivid images in his readers’ head, his joyful ending is preferred to the dark tones of Edwards’…

    • 1071 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Hamlet reaches an internal climax; he no longer wants to live knowing that Claudius murdered his father, Gertrude married his father's murderer, or that he is not able to spend his life with Ophelia. These questions allow for a deeper insight into how Hamlet feels regarding what is going on around him. Since Hamlet thinks life’s burdens will never wear off, he develops the idea that the life hereafter will offer him tremendous peace. Therefore, his theology is directly related to the actions he takes. Once he begins to take into account the beliefs in the Bible, Hamlet’s fear is unraveled.…

    • 1351 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Milton ultimately creates the patriarchy with the fall of Adam and Eve as he deals them their punishments for disobeying him. Williamson describes the multiple purposes God has in mind with these consequences, stating, “In Milton’s strategy the didactic element is intended both to motivate and to amplify the tragic consequences of the fall of man” (Williamson). The fact that men would have to labor for the rest of their lives to provide for their families was meant to motivate them to work hard and also increase the punishment for deliberately disobeying God. Eve is punished in the way that she along with all other women will go through a great amount of pain during childbirth. She will also have to submit herself to Adam, thus creating the patriarchy.…

    • 1262 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The play is a representation of what Christians have to do or how they would spend their lives to spare their souls from being condemned by death. The comprehension of death in "Everyman" play is affected by how people experience their lives. The play draws out a thought of how individuals battle to pick between secular things and a definitive divine judgment. The struggle between wealth, relationship and the spiritual enrichment, heaven and hell and God 's decision is by all accounts on the rise in the play. We perceive how life is temporary, when the play records Everyman 's trip from corrupt life to sin free life lastly to a holy decease.…

    • 1608 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Relationship Between God and Man Within Myths Gods have expectations that man struggles to understand. The Epic of Gilgamesh, Popol Vuh, and Genesis, like many creation stories, show similar themes that create a common lesson for the reader to learn from. There are rules, laws and commandments that the gods use to instruct man on how to live. When these commandments are broken, the gods impose punishments that show their authority over man. The punishment is not only given to the immediate offender, but to all of mankind.…

    • 1501 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays