Analysis Of Adam's Curse By W. B. Yeats

2010 Words 9 Pages
In Adam’s Curse, Yeats captivatingly exposes Ireland’s migration away from true love to ‘new love’. Yeats enriches his poem with a story of his lost love with a ‘beautiful mild woman’, who has ‘grown weary-hearted’ of him as a result of this ‘new love’. He cleverly interconnects this narration with the reason behind Ireland’s shift away from true love; foreign influence, producing the malformed and distorted, ‘new love’. Communally, through this interconnection enriched with symbolism, imagery, and allusion; Yeats successfully exposes the dangers of ‘new love’, for it is an illusion, resulting in the emotional despondency of any who seek true love. From the first stanza, Yeats successfully exposes the reason behind Ireland’s shift away …show more content…
Throughout Yeat’s poetry, the foreign influence he commonly alludes to is Britain, for during the late 19th to early 20th century, they controlled their schooling system, and heavily influenced their religious practices. Yeats suggests that the once strongly regarded poetry that enriched old Ireland’s culture no longer has meaning, for his ‘stitching and unstitching has been naught’. He even goes as far to compare the profession to now being as worthless as a kitchen scrubber or a stone breaker. This is concerning, for poetry is a mode of expressing one’s true feelings; including love. There is much to learn through poetry pertaining to true love, however, if it is worthless in Ireland, than those learning opportunities are lost. Yeats propounds how it is no longer the poetry or old Irish teachings impacting the new generation, but rather the British bankers, schoolmasters, and clergymen; the most influential people in society. The power within his short but concrete statement, ‘the martyrs run the world’, solidifies this belief, for the martyrs who are ‘killing’ the old Irish ways, are now in charge. He even employs a hyperbole to detail their immense control by describing their power over the entire world; highlighting the hopelessness of old Ireland’s return. Therefore, Yeats successfully exposes the loss of poetry in Ireland as a result of British influence; expounding Ireland’s …show more content…
Through Adam’s Curse, Yeats not only comments on the movement away from true love through Ireland as a whole, but also through his own experience with ‘new love’ himself. From the first stanza, he introduces the reader to a “beautiful mild woman” (Line 2). He is referencing Maud Gonne in this lines, who he has recently lost all hope of being with, but is clearly still passionate about, for he describes her as ‘beautiful’ and ‘mild’. He “talk[s] of poetry” (Line 3) in order to cope with this loss, which is discussed in the preceding paragraph as being a method for poets to evoke feelings of true love. However, in Ireland, it is no longer the same, for his “stitching and unstitching has been naught” (Line 6). Therefore, Yeat’s coping method reveals his emotional despondency as a result of being traded by Maud Gonne as a result of Ireland’s ‘new love’, and his inability to successfully cope through poetry expounds the loss of true love, and the presence of the distorted ‘new love’ in Ireland. He references Maud Gonne in the same manner later in his poem, describing

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