Materialism In The Great Gatsby

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Throughout the novel The Great Gatsby (Fitzgerald, 1925) symbolism and metaphors are used frequently. It can be argued that Fitzgerald incorporates these elements into the very core of the novel to such a degree that it takes many re-reads of the book for the average reader to gain a full appreciation of the intrinsic subtextual nuance and complexity of Fitzgerald's work, almost to the point of unintentional circumlocution — at least to the contemporary, 21st-century reader. Examining the book in macro and micro perspectives yield the same result; it is not only in the depictions and portrayals of internal conflicts and characters that this signifying trait of Fitzgerald's writing shows, but also in the broader context: the societal critique …show more content…
By drawing unspoken parallels between the characters' personalities and their material possession he simultaneously reinforces the extent of which money and fortune can become one with the wielder and strengthens the archetypes and portrayal of his characters. A potent example of this is the house which Tom and Daisy Buchannan lives in. It is in the novel described as an uncomfortably spacious building with a homely interior. It can be argued that the spaciousness of the building serves to illustrate the psychosocial separation of Tom and Daisy, and that the homely interior is representative of the fact that their true separation is mostly covered by involuntary attachments and material conveniences (such as their child, and their marriage) that help cover their true unhappiness. Fitzgerald depicts Daisy as a particularly sad character, and Tom as an upset one. Despite them both knowing of each other's marital infidelity, the issue is never truly addressed by either one of …show more content…
Although his mansion is spacious, luxurious, and highly impressive to Nick and other characters, it is also reduced by Fitzgerald's writing as nothing more than a husk; a truly lonely space that is regularly filled with unimportant and unfulfilling partying to force the emptiness out of it. This is a metaphorical piece of parallelism that contrasts Gatsby's property with his life, which is similarly shallow and vain, partly in an attempt to impress Daisy, and partly to fill the gap that Daisy's absence causes in his life. As the story progresses, Gatsby's superficial charm and allure are progressively deconstructed, and replacing it is the image of a sad and desperate mythomaniac whose fortune builds on crime and

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