Symbolism In Heart Of Darkness By Joseph Conrad

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In the novel The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, the author establishes a parallel between Marlow 's commitment to his journey to find the infamous Kurtz and the journey to the heart of imperialism. Marlow 's journey has begun aboard “The Nellie” when his idea of imperialism is one of efficiency. As Marlow journeys down the Congo in search of the notorious Kurtz, he is astonished of the inhumane practices and the falsities that the idea of imperialism entails. Conrad shows that the idea of imperialism brings false power and purpose to people who believe in the horrid practice of imperialistic views and purposes. The Heart of Darkness is used as a metaphor to relate Marlow 's journey to the inside view of imperialistic practices.Throughout …show more content…
The heads on the sticks symbolize Kurtz 's excessive brutality and his contentment towards imperialism as well as his commitment to the overall cause of …show more content…
Conrad, through this philosophy, attempts to exhibit the lies and the abuse of power behind imperialism. It is through Marlow’s constant necessity that we see how committed to meeting Kurtz, Marlow has become. Even after Kurtz’s death, Marlow is still committed to retaining a superior reputation for Kurtz. Marlow is blinded by his inspiration to finding his own identity through Kurtz, that he chooses to ignore the barbaric things Kurtz has done. The Trading Company is so committed to power and wealth through the collection of ivory that they are blind to moral values. The Company has become so self committed to themselves that they do not see the more important concepts in life, Overall, the philosophy of commitment can be seen through Marlow shining light through the darkness of

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