Sylvia Plath The Bell Jar Analysis

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Numerous authors choose to write with a unique style, which often includes diverse perspectives about conflicts that lend themselves to concern in societal issues; this method is typically successful because it allows audiences to connect with the piece of literature and apply it to their own lives and personal experiences. Sylvia Plath is one particular author that uses her particular experiences to write about issues that are very evident within society and very applicable to various audiences. Plath’s famous novel, The Bell Jar, is an appropriate example of using personal issues to connect with her readers. Plath uses various elements centered on Esther’s, the protagonist, psychological downfall as the main focal point in this well-known …show more content…
In the beginning, Plath’s writing style was quite different from the end of her career. However, as Plath’s personality changed, so did her style of writing. At first she strived to be both brilliant and friendly, her writing style was described as “pretty”; as she became more obsessed with perfection, her style shifted to depressing and mysterious. Plath wrote pieces that would impress women’s magazines, though she received many rejections for her work (Steinberg 1). However, she published a lot during 1950 through 1951. In 1953 her poem: “Sunday at the Minton’s” won Plath a guest editorship in New York. The events she experienced here went down in her journal and would eventually go to be covered in her famous novel, The Bell Jar. Plath intended to attend a Harvard summer writing class, but after returning home physically, mentally, and emotionally unstable, she found out she had been rejected. This rejection broke Plath, and she began not being able to sleep nor write, ceasing her journal entries. Plath eventually tried to commit suicide soon after the summer ended, on August 24, 1953. She took a bottle of sleeping pills and a blanket to the cellar and went unconscious. She left her mother a note, which read, “Have gone for a long walk. Will be home tomorrow.” Her mother decided something was not right and called the police soon after finding the note. The entire town …show more content…
A study shows seventy percent of women held positions on assembly lines and worked service jobs, while twelve percent had an actual profession and six percent were in management positions, during World War II. As the men returned from the war, women’s roles changed drastically because most women went back to just being wives and mothers (Stoneham 1). The 1950s are identified as the pinnacle of gender inequality because women were belittled by being thought of as domestic creatures, less intelligent, submissive, and incompetent of completing the same task as males (“Gender Roles In A Post- War America “5). It is vital to mention that is part of the reason Esther, the protagonist of The Bell Jar, resented the society she lived in. Esther stays conflicted throughout the entirety of the novel, because she simply does not want to confine to society’s expectations for women. Although, the 1950s did not encompass the huge feminism movement; Plath setting the novel in that time period was easily relatable for women all over America (“Gender Roles In A Post- War America” 7). Plath’s novel could have perhaps been one of the most prominent reasons women did not let their anticipated roles define them and rose above all

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