Susan B. Anthony Influence On Women

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The coin was small, and its value was only one dollar, but to Betty Friedan, and to women everywhere, it was worth so much more. Every person who looked at the silver coin would see not only a picture of women’s rights activist Susan B. Anthony, but also a symbol of the changing world, and how hard people had fought to make that change. This was the first time a woman had been etched into the metal of a coin, and it meant that the efforts of Friedan and Anthony were finally paying off. Despite being lampooned and ignored, both Anthony and Friedan made it their lifes’ work to grant women basic rights. Though their lives were one hundred years apart, both feminists are responsible for many of the freedoms that women and girls experience today. …show more content…
The shape of the world would have changed quite a bit if not for the influence of the two feminists. Anthony campaigned hard for women’s suffrage, forming an organization for her feminist cause. Without her and her group, women may not have voted across America for another fifty years at least. Anthony was so influential to the nation, Carrie Chapman Catt, the woman who took over Anthony’s suffrage organization, the National American Woman Suffrage Organization, said about her predecessor,“Her 86 years measure a movement whose results have been more far-reaching in the change of conditions, social, civil and political, than those of any war of revolution since history began,” (Kendall, 110). Anthony worked very hard to earn the right for women to enroll at Rochester University. After Rochester University began to accept women, many other colleges across the nation followed suit. This allowed women to receive higher education. Friedan, almost one hundred years later, built onto what Anthony started. Friedan encouraged women, especially married women, to use their college educations. Married women did not have careers in the mid-twentieth century, especially if they were mothers. Also because of Friedan, public sex discrimination was obliterated. Before she founded the National Organization for Women (NOW), women were not allowed in some restaurants without a male accompaniment. Similar to Anthony, Friedan and NOW urged people to take …show more content…
Anthony and Betty Friedan were two of the most influential people in the world when it came to women’s rights. Anthony blazed the path that led to the
Nineteenth Amendment in 1920, allowing women to vote everywhere across America. She also helped women attend college, have rights to their earnings even after marriage, and have more professions besides teaching. Her toil for her cause led her to be the first woman ever to be minted on an American coin, thanks to the advocacy of Friedan and the National Organization for Women. Friedan, her books, and her activism put the modern feminist movement in motion. Thanks to her, women gained several rights, legally and socially. Despite their differences, both Friedan and Anthony influenced how women live today and changed the world for the

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