The Survivor Syndrome

Superior Essays
The Holocaust was one of the most documented and widely talked about massacres known to mankind. The torture and devastation that was brought about to the victims of that time is widely documented and memorials and museums have been erected across the globe in remembrance. But the assault and torture that the victims felt was not purely physical but psychological as well. The physical pains, though tremendous, stay with a singular generation for their entire lives. The psychological pains however, can last generations and still leave an imprint on the generation that is growing up today. The Survivor Syndrome that impacted the lives of many Holocaust victims greatly impacted the way the way that they saw the world and how they continued their …show more content…
From the personal Diary of Anne Frank with her account of what it was like to be in hiding for years before her eventual capture and her upsetting downfall to the story of Night by Elie Wiesel and his story of what happened to him and his family when they were captured and brought to the concentration camps. Those in hiding often did try to flee the nations where they were being captured. But with so many Jews and others looking for escape, this was at times, hopeless. Many did find refuge for a short time at least, like Anne Frank had in her secret annex, while others never had a chance. Though many people within the nation were anti-Semitic, others did do what they could to try and help. This isolation, however, made many feel like they were captured, that they were tortured. In some instances, those in hiding merely felt wronged and deserted. But alas, many spent years in isolation. Years past, so did birthdays. Some were safely able to hide out until the war was over. Others, sadly, like Anne Frank, did not have the pleasure of seeing a day after the …show more content…
Immediately afterward, the survivors began to have nightmares and recurring flashbacks about what they had experienced while in the concentration camps. Being housed in camps for displaced persons, as established by the Allies, left many victims together again, wounded but alive. It was strange for many to go back to daily life. Normal things that people no do without thinking such as using a toothbrush, toilet paper, or even a fork and knife, were difficult things to recall and revert back to after such a long time. Soon enough though, they began to revert back to daily life. Psychological treatment then soon went into effect. Psychotherapy, however, was deemed largely ineffective with survivors. But instead of trying to understand why, many Freudians just deemed it easier to blame the victim. It was deemed that they were not fully suitable for psychotherapy because they were “incapable of a full emotional response.” Others, however, acknowledged the problem and sought to discover new treatments and form a new understanding of what the survivors had gone through. Survivor syndrome is an instance of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in survivors, most related to the Holocaust. Treatment for this is moderately straightforward. Replace the maladaptive beliefs and behaviors with new ones.

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Dr. Cox’s article caused me to reflect on many struggles I had with mental illness. However, she overlooked the dreadful fact that sometimes stigma against mental illness leaves the patients no choice but to pass as sane. “Fake it til you make it” could be a feasible cure to…

    • 1844 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Both of the texts are based around survivors experiences during the Holocaust, and how they overcame the situations at hand. The authors of the novel’s had either witnessed first hand of how the Holocaust felt physically and emotionally or heard very detailed stories about it. The event was a very terrible to everyone in the world, countries that were not involved even felt the pain of those being discriminated or murdered.…

    • 1007 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Daniel Gendelberg 753 When we learn about the terrifying times during the Holocaust, the Nazis often come to mind first. Many ordinary citizens were trying to live their lives and support their families. The Nazis demanded that everyone follow their rules and beliefs, and that Jews should all be killed. Citizens decided the law was wrong when they understood that the Jews did no harm and saw the horrifying conditions of concentration camps. People were locked in wagons for days and had enormous difficulty because their limbs would not easily straighten from being squashed with others in the tiny wagons.…

    • 1896 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    I tried to convince myself that I could get through it and I wouldn’t have been dealt these cards if I couldn’t get through it. Unfortunately that didn’t work out for me. My brain was just deeply wired in its own negativity that no matter how hard I tried to convince myself I could be happy, it wouldn’t stick. Rogers theory can certainly be applied to the mentally ill because even if you aren’t in congruence, you take the steps to get there. A study was done to see what effects valuing happiness had on those who were deeply depressed, “valuing happiness was associated with increased depressive symptoms in a community sample with…

    • 1023 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    How could they if they were all separated? First is, the Holocaust was a huge part of world history. The Holocaust was a event that should never be forgotten because of how many people died. It was the biggest death camp and it was originally just a detention camp at first. "Men to the left!…

    • 710 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Introduction Mental illnesses are some of the least publicly accept illnesses being widely demonized by those who do not understand them. In the past those afflicted with mental illness locked up and hidden away from the public; patients at psychiatric hospitals were treated worst than animals. People with mental illnesses often do not receive the support that those with physical illnesses receive because their afflictions are not externally apparent. There are some who choose to believe that people with mental illnesses are faking and simply just want the attention or that these illnesses can be cured by nothing more than a simple change of minded. Because of society harsh views many individuals with mental illnesses feel ashamed of them self,…

    • 1487 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    During the war, the victims at the camps were starting to find hope, that one day they’ll free from this torture. The holocaust survivors were heartbroken because they knew that most of their family members were killed while being entrapped at these camps, they started to go insane, the low amounts of…

    • 1838 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    (“life in Auschwitz) Many of the survivors has been put into studies and has been researched how this has effected them . The survivors are sometimes asked a series of questions and they tell the researchers how they feel. Sometimes the survivors feel somewhat of survivors guilts. This mean they feel bad and upset because they are alive but some of their family members are not. There has been stories about seeing loved ones the day before but then the next day they are no-where to be seen .…

    • 1064 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Role Of PTSD In War

    • 1369 Words
    • 6 Pages

    War is an armed conflict influenced by opposing states, parties, or nations. And as a result of these events, many people are involved directly in the war and many perish during the struggle to end the war. Though the loss of life is always a terrible result, it is not the only one as a consequence of war. There are those who survived these wars but came back, sometimes sent back, home with not physical injuries but with emotional and mental ones. These psychological injuries were called many things in the past but as time passed, it was called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD.…

    • 1369 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They could never forget the horrors they had to face for years. Several of the survivors suffered from night terrors, and severe anxiety. A lot of them chose to block out their pasts entirely, in order to forget the tragedies. Keeping these things bottled up is not productive for the treatment and healing of the survivors. A lot of these liberated Jews are brave enough to share their stories around the world, traveling and teaching young people about the events that happened during the war.…

    • 1417 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays