Thesis Statement About Surrealism

Improved Essays
Baotien T. Nguyen
English 112
Professor Lin Nulman
October 25, 2017
Surrealism Art

Thesis statement: Surrealism is not only a form of art but also a cultural movement that was expressed through art, literature, and even politics.

Brodskai︠a︡, N V. Surrealism: genesis of a revolution. New York: Parkstone International, 2012. Page 6-9.
One thing cannot be doubted: Giorgio De Chirico’s paintings produced such an unforgettable impression that it became one of the most important sources in Surrealism art as it began to develop after the First World War. The closed eyes of De Chirico’s figure were associated with the call of the Romantics and Symbolists to see the world, not with their physical sight but with the “inner eye”, and to break out of
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This art movement has spread its influence out into the world, from Belgium to Japan and so forth. This source entails the different events that had occurred in several time frames throughout history. And in each time frame, It goes over the notable artists that grew out during the spread of surrealism and how their paintings of surrealism affected the movement. This source backup my claim on how surrealism affects politics and take its own course in becoming popular after World War I. This style has been so popular that multiple museums display the significance of the arts and its role in World War I. I want to compare this source during its peaks to the modern context, so in my next source, it will explain how surrealism painting affect …show more content…
The Surrealist artists sought to conduct the unconscious as a means to unlock the power of our imagination. Disparaging rationalism and realism, the Surrealists believed the rational thought repressed the power of the human imagination, weighing it down with prohibitions and restrictions. Surrealism breaks the chains of our worldly mindset and lets us dwell in the vast stretch of the imagination and therefore stretching our creativity to the furthest reaches. As the spread of surrealism spreads throughout the tunnels of history it had spread its influence not just in paintings but in dance, fashion, music, culture and so on. Today we can get a glimpse of how surrealism has impacted today’s modern artworks displayed through fashion magazine to art designs. Surrealism gave a chance for artists then and today to go out of their box and dwell in the outrageous and unorthodox forms of

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