Role Of Supernatural In Macbeth

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When you become a king of a country there is a lot of responsibility, not only for yourself, but for the community around you as well. It also comes with consequences, like the conflict after you make decisions that are a struggle as well as things you really do not want to do. Macbeth, being the King of Scotland, that all plays into part, but he also deals with the supernatural. It is not that the supernatural wanted to come to him, but he actually put himself in that situation from all the wrong doing he has committed to attain the throne of Scotland. The purpose of the witches’ apparitions played a role in Macbeth’s actions that will lead to his downfall. Supernatural is of a manifestation or event that is attributed to some force beyond scientific understanding or the laws of nature. In Macbeth, the supernatural provides a spark for action, perspicacity into character and expands the impact of many vital scenes. From reading through each act and scene of the play, it is spotted that the supernatural is definitely a significant factor on the play’s style (“Supernatural …show more content…
The bloody child then voices, “Be bloody, bold, and resolute. Laugh to scorn the power of man, for none of woman born. Shall harm Macbeth” (Shakespeare 63). According to this message, given from the apparition, Macbeth cannot be murdered by anyone born of a woman. Now keep in mind, just because Macbeth cannot be killed by a man, does not mean that a woman or anything of the environmental state can slaughter him just as swift as he did King Duncan. After hearing that statement from the second apparition, Macbeth assumes he has nothing to fear from Macduff and is home free. Once again, we find that the apparition really symbolizes Macbeth. Why? Because this time, it’s his immature naïveté that allows him to be led into such bloody desires with so little labor (“The 3 Apparitions in

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