Supernatural Elements In Edgar Allan Poe

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Edgar Allen Poe was born on January 19,1809. Israfel" is a mesmerizing poem, the beginning of which was first set down by Poe during his days at West Point College. (Allen 233) The poem itself is a direct contrast to Poe 's usual poetry, which usually deal with death and dark thoughts or other melancholy, Gothic ideas. Poe 's idea of the death of beautiful woman being the most poetical of all topics is here, nowhere to be found. This proves that Poe, when so inclined, could indeed write about something other than opium induced nightmares and paranoid grieving men who are frightened to death by sarcastic, talkative, ravens. Besides "Israfel", Poe 's other poetry, "To Helen", as well as "Annabel Lee" and others, are virtually unrecognizable …show more content…
The poem is mystical in nature and a praise of inspiration, which is represented by the angel Israfel, who dwells in heaven and sings so beautifully that the stars themselves have to stop and listen. Poe 's note on the text itself is taken from The Koran and reads as this: " And the angel Israfel, whose heartstrings are a lute, and who has the sweetest voice of all God 's creatures. Koran." Coleridge 's, "Kubla Khan", in British literature, is similar to "Israfel", in that they both offer a heavenly place of the "ideal." Israfel seems to represent a muse, of some sort, to Poe. He sits in heaven strumming his lyre and the overabundance of his voice carries over to earth, where Poe sits awaiting the stirring of emotion. Poetry is the evidence of Israfel 's existence. Who does Israfel represent? Is it Poe himself? It is easy to think that, considering the arrogance of Poe. I 'm sure he especially would have liked to think this, that he was Israfel the angel, baring his soul to the creatures of earth, human and all, exalting himself as the best poet of all the other angels, so great that they must set down their own attempts of singing and poetry and listen to his. Poe …show more content…
It is in lines sixteen through twenty-two that we first catch a glimpse of the physical side of Poe and his connections with the angel Israfel. He mentions "Israfeli 's fire", a fire that is owes it 's payment to a lyre, or a musical instrument. He sits by this lyre, "the trembling living wire of those unusual strings", or he sits by the poet and strums the living heart strings of man so that he may produce his art, be it poetry, prose, or painting. It could be that Poe is also suggesting that Israfel is also owing to us in that we are an outlet for his song on this earth. We allow for his creativity to be expressed, not just in heaven or the spiritual plain, but in the physical world as well. That way all of God 's creatures may experience the beauty of his song and not dwell on the troubles of everyday life. It is a oneness with Israfel that Poe is hoping to achieve, in the physical body or mind and also in the soul. Israfel represents our creativity and the place from which it comes, Heaven or God. Some people such as poets, writers, artists and such are more attuned to Israfel and interact with it on a daily basis. Others hardly ever catch glimpses of Israfel and do not have to deal with the frustrations that come from hearing his songs. Next, Poe speaks of the heavenly place that Israfel resides, "where deep

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