Summary: What The Buddha Taught: Buddhism

Improved Essays
Joseph U. Akhuetie
CORC 3202
November 8, 2016
What The Buddha Taught Buddhism is an act of truth, peace, and freedom and most importantly the control of the mind. It is also a practice that teaches emotional growth and human intelligence. It is said that only a man can potentially be a Buddha only if he has the desire and will to practice its endeavors and teachings to which he shall be regarded as a “super-human” meaning perfect in his ways.
According to the book “What the Buddha taught” page xv, Buddha was founded by a man named Siddhartha at age 35 who was born in North India in the 6th century B.C and became an ascetic in search of solutions. For six years he wandered about the valley of the Ganges, meeting famous religious teachers, studying and following their systems and methods, and submitting himself to rigorous ascetic practices until he abandoned their religious beliefs and teachings feeling unsatisfied and empty and gained enlightenment delivering sermons for 45 years till his death at the age of 80.
It is believed that “Man 's position, according to Buddhism, is supreme. Man is his own master, and there is no higher being or power that sits
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The four noble truth help me understand that life exists in a delicate balance and as humans we must learn to be our own master and strife for what is good rather than the mare pleasures of oneself. The book teaches us as humans to be a follower of truth and avoid every doubt and as well help create an energy of sound mind and emotional stability. As humans, we are taught that perfection is something that can never be achieved but with the wise words of the Buddha we have the power to free ourselves from every bondage and be at peace to what the world has to offer to us as humans. It also explained that there might be doubt in the mind but is not one’s fault but is what makes us

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