Amy Chua Analysis

1956 Words 8 Pages
Amy Chua, the author of this novel, tries to establish her credibility on the subject about the clash of Chinese and Western cultures by giving a number of examples and insights on her life. She is a professor at Yale and went to law school at Harvard. Many would trust her credibility and her comments because she came from an acclaimed and regarded school. Nevertheless, some things could be taken in for inquiring. Specifically, she never permits her children attend a sleepover, get any grade less than an A, and requires obedience (3). My mother is strictly the same in this matter. I personally concluded that she presented a credible argument because I was able to relate to her in this case. Chua does state that this book is a memoir and not …show more content…
For example, she seems to reason that Westernized parenting is more easygoing than Chinese parenting. When she lets Lulu initiate tennis lessons she compares herself to a Western parent and saying that she exists to be a failure (214). Just like she says, Chinese parenting is the weakest when it comes to debacle because they strive for success (146). This majority of this story revolves around how one daughter, Sophia, does what she is told and is what a Chinese parent expects. On the other hand, her other daughter, Lulu, revolts and evokes her rethink about Chinese parenting. At the end, Lulu gets what she desires and her mother has to be supportive of her decisions even though they conflict with her …show more content…
There are many topics in this that some people would not agree upon. Chua pointed out in the beginning that Westernized parenting is more about accepting their children’s character and passions. However, the Chinese assume that the best way is to prepare them for the future by indoctrinating them skills, gainful work habits, and inner confidence (63). There would be some who would conflict with this generalization. There should be several facts to support the belief that Westernized parenting is more about individuality and hopes. Some of the materials she wrote about can be quite controversial. For example, she insisted “But here is one thing I am sure of: Western children are definitely no happier than Chinese ones.” (101). Again, there are generalizations and no hard authentication is contributed. She admits that her husband, Jed, furiously tells her that she is producing “overgeneralizations” (171). I do believe that she does make some overgeneralizations like the ones she makes when she presents the three big differences between the Chinese and Western parental values. Her first point being that Western parents are more worried about their child’s self-esteem. Second, Chinese parents are assured that their children owe them everything. Lastly, Chinese parents declare that they know what is best for their children and overrides the child’s wants. However, Chua pointed out that Chinese parents would give up anything for their children

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