Summary Of The Prince By Niccolò Machiavelli's The Prince

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The Prince by Niccolò Machiavelli was written as a gift to gain favor of Lorenzo de Medici, the de facto oligarchic ruler of the Florentine Republic and one of the most powerful persons of the Renaissance. Niccolò Machiavelli was a Renaissance historian, diplomat, philosopher, and writer. He witnessed the expulsion of the Medici family and the rise of Girolamo Savanorola, a Dominican religious zealot who controlled the region after. During this time, Italy became a landscape of political conflict where the many city states, including the Holy Roman Empire, fought for control of Italy. In 1497, Savanorola was excommunicated by Pope Alexander VI and in 1512, the Medici family returned to power in Florence. Machiavelli was removed from his positions …show more content…
During his imprisonment, Machiavelli wrote The Prince in an attempt to land an advisory position within the Florentine government. His gift to Medici was ignored, and Machiavelli remained exiled. He died at 58. I chose this book because it is a classic analysis and guide to acquiring and maintaining political powers, and contains overall useful information about how the balance of power works in the world. In addition, Machiavelli was a father of one of the Dark Triads of Psychology: psychopathy, narcissism, and, the subject of focus, Machiavellian, which sparks my interest as I pursue the career goal of forensic psychologist. The term Machiavellian refers to being a devious, cruel tyrant, who uses any means to achieve his goals. Twentieth century dictators praised Machiavelli 's masterpiece because in modern ideas, its literary foresight makes it a classic. The forensic aspect of my job will lead to me encountering many individuals who maintain these ideals, mostly the violent and corrupt acts of this. This novel is a traditional representation of power, …show more content…
The first section covers four types of principalities, the first of which being hereditary principalities, which are inherited by the ruler. The second is mixed principalities, or territories annexed to the ruler 's existing territories. The third are new principalities, which may be acquired by one 's own power, the power of others, by criminal acts or extreme cruelty, or by the will of the citizens. The final is ecclesiastical principalities, which are given power by Papal States and the Catholic

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