Summary Of The Poem Unrequited Love

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Love has been constantly defined as a beautiful, optimistic, and hopeful emotion. It fills people with joy and delight, leading their hearts to never-ending laughter. However, in the performed poem "Unrequited Love", Sierra DeMulder sees loving another to be gut-wrenching and mentally agonizing. In the poem, the speaker talks about watching someone her listener loves have feelings for another woman. When the person that she is speaking to first find out that there is another woman, that person tries to act natural. Instead, she ends up getting herself drunk to remove the picture of the person she loves kissing someone else. That woman would be the center of attention (not in a good way). On the other hand, if the listener’s crush calls her, …show more content…
If he greets her, it is not because she is special. When she is being told what a soulmate is, it is always him that fits the description. His actions will make her tingle inside, but the speaker keeps reminding her that she is not special. She will find small traces of the other woman’s belongings in his house, wishing that those were hers. The speaker says that the girl will wonder what the other woman would look like, where she is from, and how she looks. She would want to tell him that she loves him, but the speaker tells her that she needs to resist because it is the other woman that he wants (his favorite), whereas she is the person who he talks to as a reminder that people will miss him when he leaves. In the performed poem "Unrequited Love," Sierra DeMulder uses repetitive sound patterns, vivid metaphors, and soft subtle performance indications to express self-deprecated pain in a one-sided …show more content…
For instance, a metaphor was used to imitate discomfort when the speaker imagines talking to her crush on the phone. She deeply wishes she could avoid “the hundreds of ropes / untangling themselves in [her] stomach” (DeMulder 0:55-0:58). The metaphor makes the sensation she is trying to create into a stronger poetically-written statement about the physical affliction of one-sided love. In a similar way, she described a soulmate as someone who gives the most emotions through another strong metaphor. She defined it as someone “who can drag you / giggling with forgiveness from the cellar they locked you in” (1:37-1:41). The term “soulmate” is compared to that of not keeping control of his or her actions emotions. Being in pain because of loving someone who does not love back causes people to lose a sense of reality. Likewise, the speaker describes the listener’s uncontrollable behavior through a metaphorical thought: "My body is a dead language and you pronounce each word perfectly” (3:09-3:13). The listener wishes she could tell the person she loves that she feels unable to function properly: it is inferred by the poem’s metaphor comparing her body to a “dead language”. The pain that she feels comes from the lhopelessness of being unable to tell him how she actually feels about him. DeMulder’s use of metaphors gives more accurate descriptions of indescribable feelings

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