Character Analysis Of Rochester In Jane Eyre

Great Essays
Character Analysis: Edward Fairfax Rochester There are many characters in the novel Jane Eyre who all serve a common purpose. It is to impose numerous conflicts on Jane and to see how she reacts. The most important character for achieving this purpose is Edward Fairfax Rochester, because his actions in Jane Eyre must be kept in mind when understanding Jane’s decisions. One of Rochester’s major contribution to the novel is his admirable transformation from being selfish and idealistic to mature and accepting.
When Rochester originally plans to marry Jane, he is selfish and idealistic. His plans to use Jane for his own purposes is blinded by the idea that he loves her. When they are married, Rochester hopes to travel with Jane to all the places
…show more content…
He grieves when Jane leaves Thornfield. However, it proves to be beneficial. Only when Jane leaves does Rochester realize how much she meant to him. Instead of seeing her as a mythical being coming to save him from his faults, he now sees her as a person and “[longs] for [her] both with soul and flesh” (Brontë 515). When she returns, he no longer sees her as a mythical being coming to save him. It is interesting how he is now blind and yet he finally “sees” her as she truly is. Rochester also no longer cares about extravagance and when they plan to marry at the end, he even says “never mind fine clothes and jewels, now: all that is not worth a fillip” (Brontë 514). This proves that he has finally matured, because now he cares about what Jane instead of focusing on what he is going to gain from the marriage. Rochester also becomes more religious as a result of Jane leaving. At the end of the novel, he tells Jane “[his] heart swells with gratitude to the beneficent God of this earth” (Brontë 514). Rochester believes that since God forgave him of his past faults, he can now find peace within himself and within Jane. This is important, because it indicates that he has fully matured and he is truly prepared to marry Jane. Rochester’s ability of finally accepting of what Jane is actually like is important to the romantic and happy ending of the …show more content…
I saw the 2011 film adaptation of it a couple years ago, and ever since then, I promised myself that I would read the book too. However, I never got a chance to read it until now. The novel exceeded my expectations. I thought many of the problems presented in it corresponded with a lot of issues seen today, such as the feminist movement and religious hypocrisy. One incident in the story that I found the most interesting was in the beginning when Jane presents her true feelings to her cruel Aunt Reed. Even though she was a young girl, I found the speech very empowering and inspiring, because she goes against what society expects of children and asserts her independence. I almost liked every part of the book, except the section in which she goes to live with St. John Rivers and his sisters. I found it frustrating how he could not just accept that Jane did not want to marry him and how he would not just let her live her own life. Overall, I thought Jane Eyre was amazing, and I now consider it to be one of my favorite

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Cordelia loves Lear more than her sisters do, but because she is unable to “heave” her heart into her mouth, her integrity prevents her from making a false declaration in order to gain his wealth. Lear’s rage at what he expects to be her lack of affection sets the tragedy in motion. Cordelia’s refusal to flatter Lear, then, establishes her virtue and the authenticity of her love, while bringing about Lear’s dreadful error of judgment. Cordelia understands that her father, even though she may see him as a great man, even he has his faults. His rejection of her during the beginning of the play symbolizes the beginning of the end for their relationship.…

    • 1436 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Similarly, Jane stresses him that she is an independent person with free will (293). In these two points, Jane with her reaction she seems to believe that through marriage, she would lose her freedom, she would enter into a relationship with a lot of responsibilities, and she is going to be in an inferior position. Moreover, Jane gets angry when Mr Rochester wants to buy her a jewellery. That makes her feel uncomfortable, she copes with the fact that her lover its her master too (309-310). For fear that her independence would be diminished, she announces to him that she wants to continue to be a governess (310).…

    • 1327 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Daisy however does conform to make Gatsby happy and says that she never loved Tom. Even though she knows she loved him. Daisy feels immense pressure to choose, and then she realizes that Gatsby is just trying to restore their past. However, Daisy is more worried about the future. Gatsby thinks that the reason Daisy chose him is, because of their old relationship and how it used to be; whereas the true reason is, because Daisy thinks it will be better for her in the future.…

    • 971 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    St. John’s sister, Diana also backs up Jane that she must not feel pressured to marry a man she does not love. If she goes with St. John, it will be as an equal, never as his wife because, as she has observed, he does not have the qualities of a husband. He is entirely too self-centered and focused on his goal. If she goes with him as his wife, it is entirely likely he will work her to death and then pray for her instead of working with her. While, Jane’s love for Rochester is still very strong.…

    • 1338 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Though it would have been a hassle for other woman, Jane sees it that she is no longer going to be told what to do by a man or higher standing individual, but rather the opposite. She could help Rochester and they would be happy together, “All my confidence is bestowed on him; all his confidence is devoted to me; we are precisely suited in character-perfect concord is the result.” They were meant to be and all the doubts about marriage Jane had had were cast away. She was in fact, in a relationship with a man who loved her more than anything, with a baby that resembled Rochester, and living the life she had so long waited all her life. Jane Eyre was finally happy. The same Jane who had been an outcast in her childhood home, sent away from Gateshead to…

    • 1089 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Therefore, whenever Mr. Collins’ says anything “Charlotte wisely [does] not hear” it. If she did pay attention to what he is saying, she will always be embarrassed, because he is always saying foolish things, or compliments women, even though he is married. Fortunately, Mr. Collins is seen as unimportant to Charlotte’s eyes, making it easy for her to forget about him, which brings “a great deal of comfort [in the house].” Charlotte’s abilities to forget about him, allows her to be able to relax, and do her own tasks without having any type of disturbance form Mr. Collins and his thoughts. Charlotte’s reason for marriage is based on the convenience of having money and a home, while Mr. Collins reasons for marriage is to please someone else. Their marriage is heavily influenced by…

    • 1045 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Hester comes out as a young woman who is ashamed of her actions for committing adultery however still deeply cares for her child. To me she seems as if she bears a dark secret or perhaps pain for what she had done. The author compares Hester and her daughter as sins, however also later mentioning that pearl is a blessing. Hester uses the baby to confirm to herself that everything happening to her is real and there. Chapters 4-5: Hester at first decides not to drink the medicine given to her by Chillingworth, however her former husband explains to her that he doesn’t want to kill her and wants to keep her alive for his revenge.…

    • 1362 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    "The Necklace" ended with Madame Loisel becoming less materialistic. From the beginning, the reader will establish that Madame Loisel only valued appearances and will not realize how hard any of it might be for her husband. By the end, she had finally taken up the hard work, and even made sacrifices for her husband, by doing dishes and the heavy housework. It is implied by the ending that if she had had different values form the beginning, she and her husband would not have to have gone through what they did. Madame Loisel could have been happy with what she had and not have had to sacrifice so much.…

    • 1768 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    First of all, the decisions she makes concerning her husband, Tom, result in both Jay’s and Myrtle’s deaths. She doesn’t confront him about his mistress Myrtle which could have possibly put an end to the situation if Tom had known that she knew about the affair. She and Tom could have talked things out and eventually could have forgiven each other. Instead, she plays the “dramatic enactment of the role of long-suffering beautiful fool” (Wershoven 2). By doing this she also attracts the hopeful Jay Gatsby who was looking to save her in a way due to his fantasy of being with her even if it was just for the idea of being with her.…

    • 1436 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He does this so that he can start the process to tame Katherine. By doing skipping the wedding party to gain control over his wife, Petruchio shows that he does not care about Katherine´s wellbeing and clearly shows that he only cares…

    • 1089 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays

Related Topics