Summary Of Racism In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

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There are many subjects that throughout time have been considered, “taboo.” That was until Mark Twain wrote Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. In this novel, twain writes about many of these subjects that would have never been included in literature before. He approaches the topics of slavery, child abuse, Southern hypocrisy, and racism, all while satirizing them. Twain is attempting to portray these ideals to his reader, but keep it comical by including the satire along with it. Many even say that Twain was a revolutionary for expressing his beliefs in such a fashion. In Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain uses four main characters, or groups of characters, to show southern dialect, evolution of characters, and satirize the south and conflicts …show more content…
Tom believes in slavery, making Huck shocked when he says that he will help him steal Jim out of slavery. “ I’ll help you steal him!” (Twain 228). Huck has come to the point where he decides he will go and steal Jim from slavery. He tells tom not to tell anyone, but Tom says he will help him steal him, catching Huck way off guard. He knows that Tom is a supporter of slavery and that he hates abolitionists. Twain makes the reader think twice about Tom here, and whether or not he is a good or bad kid. Up until this point Twain has given the reader mixed feeling about Tom, but now Tom appears to be a good kid willing to help out a friend. One major flaw of Tom’s, is that he loves to be in charge, and it is always his opinion or nothing else. “Oh, shucks, Huck Finn, if I were as ignorant as you I’d keep still-that’s what I’D do,” (Twain 242). Tom Sawyer just loves to be in charge, and unfortunately, Huck lets him take charge. Twain is satirizing two things in just this one little situation. He is attempting to use Tom to show greed and over-confidence, and using Huck to show willingness and gullibility. Many people are either in over their head, or they are too gullible and let everybody else do what they want to do. Huck lets Tom run all over him, only because of the demeanor that Tom presents himself with. Huck presents very many simple, practical ideas for how to help Jim escape, but Tom is not having it. He …show more content…
Mark Twain is an expert at manipulating his audience. The people that he is trying to reach are the rich, white men, mostly in the south. He does this in a way by telling a great story about a young boy on an adventure with a black man. He is trying to get the point across to them that race does not matter, but he does this in a way by making them connect with the characters. The reader is instantly forced to form a relationship with Huck Finn. As Huck and Jim continue their trip down the river, the reader develops a strong relationship with Jim as well, wishing for him to be free. The reader, while they might not realize it, begins to see the hardships and slavery and all of the conflicts that a slave would face. These rich, white men that Twain is attempting to reach out to, are being persuaded in a new direction by seeing the strong bond between Huck and Jim. Twain successfully uses dialect, characters, and conflicts to create one of the best pieces of social commentary ever, and is able to reach his audience with a clever, indirect

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