Ambiguity In Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Notes From The Underground

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We all are, in a sense between Netflix and work, arbitrary creatures subjugated by society 's “free will” and capitalistic doctrines. Without careful introspection, we overlook the mental distance between our oughts and our wants as we slowly lose control over our lives. Most peoplesee the onslaught of individual will by our highly demanding, hierarchical, and intelligence-oriented society, but are unable to act against it. It is a lost cause, or rather a triumphant one, that despite scholastic indoctrinations and stigmatizing education, most of us are still not reduced to one dimensional thinking and stifled emotions. The constant imbalance between our emotional desires and social expectations is much like the idea of sex in a catholic school …show more content…
His novel “Notes from the Underground” portrays an amoral and self-conflicting character who indeed lives in everyone at some point of their lives. In “Notes”, Dostoveysky deliberately, and quite playfully (though that 'playfulness ' presents itself more as a suicidal tendency than anything else) denotes the ambiguity of absolutism in face of the irrational human nature. Using a fictional, lonely, and deranged personality as the narrating voice of the novel, Dostoyevsky contrives nonsensical inner dialogues to present common human angst in a carefully calculated world. He purports that humans suffer from the discrepancy that despite our desires to do good or bad, we are restrained by social expectations. Dostoyevsky supplies a critical anatomy of the struggles to find peace with our inner desires, or more importantly, to maintain the appearance of peace. The Underground Man, the sheltered and demented recluse, seeks within himself – rather successfully for an amateur Buddhist – to justify his spiteful and self-loathing behaviors to his audience. In the text, it is evident that the Underground Man yearns for attention and social acceptance, but he is too trapped in his absolutist views on social interactions to realize that he too, can be …show more content…
The Underground Man is a prime example of the id taking action to decide on how best to respond to his pleasure needs. It is seen in the novel that the Underground Man was many times caught between his ego and his id, and was unable to decide which outweighs which. He is such a confusing character because he was always creating false assumptions and matriculating vengeful plans after them. Fortunately, it never works out for him. Ironically, despite his absolute certitude that things will follow through the way he imagined, they often manifest differently in the future. As readers, let us not blame his perceptive and fast-acting wit. Instead, say that his id is in touch with the wrong side of reality. What we can often find in this novel, though, is that the id is always the autocrat mercilessly slaying the ego. Now, Freud would argue otherwise, but in the scope of the human nature, when was logic and reason ever part of our inherent design? I don 't recall carrying a measuring tape fresh out of the womb. Books tell us, for instance David Mitchell 's “Cloud Atlas,” and Albert Einstein 's non-fiction “Ideas and Opinions,” excessive reason brings the end of humanity. It was perhaps this line of thinking that brought mid-nineteenth century Russia into emulating the romantic west at the time this text was

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