Summary Of Mark Hyman's 'The Parent Trap'

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This book was definitely an interesting read and provided me with valuable information to how the youth sports world works. The authors main theme of this book was to give an overview of the youth sports industry by providing real life situations. Some of theses real life situations included families from all across the United States. Now, Hyman’s process of putting these family testimonies required a lot of hard work. During this process, Hyman will interview the family about what they have done for their child 's sports lives while also providing facts on that particular sport. While doing this, he will also provide testimonials from professionals within that particular field or sport. Secondly, the overall purpose of incorporating these …show more content…
Each chapter is like a timeline of of a child 's life throughout the world sports (The parent trap, baby goes pro etc). Chapter one introduces the idea of how much it costs to play youth sports. This includes all of the expenses that families and teams go through during this course of a year or a season. Hyman highlights these expenses through three families. Each kid plays a different sport, but his main goal is to show that no matter the sport, costs can run high for any child (age and sport). However, the title of this chapter “The Parent Trap” is also why youth sports have changed overtime. Parents are just guilty as Nike, Gatorade etc. This is chapter is best summarized when Hyman writes, “the sports life of adolescents should not be a four figure annual investment. Yet when faced with a choice to spend or not to, we seldom choose the latter” (Hyman 13). The author here is simply saying that even when parents are faced with a financial decision, they still choose to spend their money. On the other hand, chapter 2 demonstrates how young kids are willing to begin sports. Hyman tracked down several companies that offer sports from as young as six months old! They claim their respective companies are able to provide some kind of athletic advantage. As crazy and baffling as this sounds, Hyman is able make a connection that there is no distinct advantage that kids receive when participating in …show more content…
Hyman talks about the financial aspect, school sacrifice, and the hopes that these kids have of impressing a college coach for a potential scholarship. During chapter 5, the main problem is that these nationally ranked basketball powerhouses are constantly on the go. Once the kids start school, they are thrown into the fire. Going through weeks of training, playing the regular season, post-season, national tournaments, and then summer ball. No wonder why these athletes are so tired. They have been exposed and overexposed to basketball for an entire year straight without stopping. This has become one of the main reasons why young athletes tend to give up their beloved sport because they were simply burned out on it. Likewise, chapter 6 discusses how kids are willing to drive hundred of miles, spend hundreds of dollars, just to try to impress a college coach. One of the examples Hyman uses is the Nike SPARQ combine. This particular combine is particularly for football players all across the United States. The Nike SPARQ combines are best summarized when he writes, “In 2010, Nike reported that more than fifteen thousand high school players were rated… A year later these combines were stage from January to June in sixteen cities from Hawaii to Alabama” (Hyman 105). Hyman

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