Summary Of Jeffery Cohen's Monster Culture

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In “Monster Culture (Seven Theses)” Jeffery Cohen explains the concept that he calls “monster culture”. Cohen introduces his topic with concepts of monsters being something not affected by time, and that there has been a tendency for hybrid monsters due to generational behavior. In the article Cohen uses his seven theses to convey his thoughts, each pertaining to a different aspect of his “monster culture.” Thesis one is used to portray his outlook on cultural influence on the monster. Cohen concludes that the body of the monster is a direct result of the culture that it is created after, allowing for monsters to carry significant meaning to them. Thesis two is connected to how monsters have a relationship with time. Cohen highlights that monsters have been a reoccurring entity, regardless of previous tales. The concepts presented in these theses are built upon throughout the paper. …show more content…
Cohen presents that even as society may even come to incorporate something in a monster, they will eventually return to the border line of society. In thesis four Cohan elaborates of the origination of monsters because of differences. He even shows the reader examples of when we have created monsters not only out of beasts, but made people into monsters. In thesis five and six, Cohen writes about people using monsters to create something they cannot be, and also to show why they cannot. Cohen even puts forth a question about monsters existence, without our own. Wrapping up the article with thesis seven, Cohen proposes the idea that we as people are the ones that create monsters. Out of the differences we perceive around us, and even that which we might see in ourselves, the monsters we create will always come out of the shadows of our minds again and

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