Summary Of Elizabeth Anderson's Imperative Of Integration

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Introduction
According to Elizabeth Anderson in her book Imperative of Integration, she argues that “segregation of social groups is a principal cause of group inequality” (2). She believes that segregation isolates marginalized groups from access to resources, capital, and social networks. This case is particularly relevant when examining the gap between whites and blacks in America. Historically, this country was founded upon the principles that justified slavery, racism, and inequality. Today, there remains material evidence of structural inequality that proves that segregation is the “linchpin” of economic inequality.
In this essay, I argue that because discriminant policies and ideologies make it virtually impossible for Black Americans
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There is a large misconception in America that racism ended after the end of the Civil Rights Movement. However, “African Americans are worse off than the average American, and worse off than whites, on virtually all major objective measures of well-being” (23). Today, black-white social and economic inequalities are massive and enduring. Blacks are more likely to suffer from high infant mortality rate, poverty, unequal employment, lack of educational attainment, and a weak relationship to the state. In terms of spatial and residential segregation, racist policies such as redlining, restrictive covenants, zoning, and discriminatory lending have socially reproduced inequality in overall …show more content…
While this was a movement that has unfortunately developed in reaction to the racist system, the existence and growth of this movement is quite telling of why integration still matters and how segregation causes inequality.
Anderson talks about over-enforcement of law as a product of segregation. As crime and poverty typify segregated black neighborhoods, stigmas intensify surrounding the black identity. Stereotypes of young, Black men (black community in general) state that they are dangerous, criminals, lazy, and substance abusers. These dominant ideologies of the black community create racial profiling and harsh justice that reproduce “Blacks’ mistrust of police, born of long experience with the failure of the police to protect them” (42).
Just recently in Chicago, a cover up of the shooting of 17-year old Lacquan McDonald resurfaced and gained international media attention. Lacquan was shot 16 times. This death is only one example of the many young, unarmed, Black men that have died at the hands of the police. Lacquan lived the life that was typical of a kid living in Southside Chicago. Born into poverty, he lived in different foster care homes and with various relatives. He lived an unstable life that was a product of institutional discriminant policies and ideologies. His mother supposedly did not provide him with the proper care or supervision, which presents

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