Summary Of Bama's Story In Sangati By B. R Ambedkar

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Dalit literature emerged as a response to the hegemonic Brahminic oppression and its various forms of silencing the Dalits. Though there are various thinkers, such as Buddha, Jyotiba Phule, S.M. Mate who were concerned about the plight of the lowest caste and untouchables but it was B.R. Ambedkar (1891-1956), who is considered "the pioneer of Dalit literature" (Dangle vii). Ambedkar's writing and his political activism played a significant role in understanding the injustices and atrocities of the Dalit people. Ambedkar's extensive writings and speeches on caste, religion, untouchability, Adivasis and tribes not only challenged the received norm that Brahmin remains at the top in the social hierarchy and is, naturally, entitled to power. But …show more content…
It dissects how caste Brahmin's superiority and his power as a privileged "white man" taken for granted, seriously undermines the Dalit subjectivity, and, also, exposes the discrepancy between the professed beliefs of the Christianity, a supposedly casteless society, and its practices in India. Limbale in his novel, Hindu (2010), explores the murder of a Dalit activist by a group of upper caste people because his activism crosses the expectations of the establishment and threatens the conventional "order" through his Ambedkarite theatre. Limbale, according to Alok Mukherjee, "establishes the Dallits' subalternity not in a colonial structure, but in the caste-based social, cultural and economic structure of Hindu society" (2). Ilaiah suggests an alternative nationalism, "buffalo nationalism" challenging the cow worship by Brahmin upper caste people and its placement in the nationalist rhetoric. Bheda (2017), the first Odiya Dalit novel by Akhila Naik , set in a remote village of western India, underscores poverty, famine, drought, child trade and malnutrition, exposes the Indian hypocrisy and its claim of a welfare nation-state. Naik shows what it means to be a Dalit in India and how the Upper caste people manipulate the state power to supress the …show more content…
The multinational companies, which flood into the areas rich in natural resources inhabited and maintained by the tribal communities, pose a serious threat not only to the tribal cultures and communities that have existed there for centuries, even before the arrival of the Aryan race in the Indian subcontinent, but also the existence of the tribal communities is in question by various cultural, linguistic and socio-economic forces that function in lieu of the elite bourgeoisie. Brahminic mission of control is translated in a circular way through an economic liberalism in Adivasi world. For instance, Out of this Earth explores the impact of free trade and free market economy in tribal communities and shows how the multinational companies, particularly aluminum mining, pose threat not only to the tribal communities but also to the chemical and geological

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