Summary: An Analysis Of Thomas Jefferson's Dilemmas

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Jefferson’s Dilemma The United States history thus so far, is full of many bargains but one of the most controversial and beneficial bargains is the Louisiana Purchase. This bargain occurred back in the 1800s of which the President Thomas Jefferson was able to undertake the deal of the century. This bargain initiated when Jefferson wanted to purchase New Orleans because France was enforcing stricter regulations therefore, making it difficult for American settlers to trade in that particular location. Then Talleyrand proposed “what will you give for the whole Louisiana,” a counter offer that the nearly deaf American Robert Livingston, was in no position to undertake. This offer then brought about a series of the most radical things that President …show more content…
He was a “strict constructionist meaning that he believed the government could only do things specifically named in the constitution.” Next, the Government was also unsure on how to govern the newly acquired land. The politicians also discussed about what they would do with the French settlers already living there whether to kick them out or to give them different treatment since they were French. It was also said that the “acquisition of Louisiana would only benefit the western states and give power to the southern states.” Thomas Jefferson, being the strict constructionist, tended to abide the constitution no matter what the circumstances. He even went on to challenge Alexander Hamilton’s national bank idea since the constitution it did not explicitly say anything about building a bank. However, the Louisiana Purchase was a whole different story; it was a deal that even the Jefferson could not decline. He would be a fool if he declined the offer …show more content…
Among these obstacles was the lack of governmental organization which further fueled the issues. A few suggestions were implied of which one resolution was that it could be turned into a colonial possession or made into one big state as it was already or divide it into multiple states. Since Jefferson, himself, was not expecting to govern more than just New Orleans; he had gotten more than he had originally bargained for. Given the new circumstances Jefferson now had more land to govern and more people to oversee. Not only was he watching over his own people, he had to watch over their own enemies the French and the Indians. This alone was a difficult task, since the nation was not sure what to do with the French, they could kick them out, turn them into slaves, or imprison them. As for the Indians, it was just as bad, since they were getting kicked off their own homeland and being forced into other communities. These possible solutions would only spark more fighting and violence towards the English farmers or settlers moving

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