Suger's Role In Gothic Architecture

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Religion has always been a part of our identity. Today, we wonder around the world seeing these wonderful churches and religious buildings all around us. The architectural style of the Middle Ages was very prominent: high stone vaults, internal elevations of multiple stories, rounded arches and thick walls. This was characterized as Romanesque architecture. One day, a man named Suger changed everything. He reworked these ideas introduced to the world the now known Gothic architecture. Gothic architecture was a big role-player during the Renaissance. But everything started when Suger decided to reinvent the traditional heavy Romanesque Abbey Church of Saint-Denis into a free-flowing monastic building. In this essay I will be talking about the Capetian dynasty’s background, the history of the Abbey Church of Saint-Denis and the significance of the place, Abbot Suger’s ties with the Capetian Kings, and Abbot Suger’s plans for the Royal Abbey. I will be ending this analysis with the legacy left behind by the influence of the Abbot and the Abbey. …show more content…
The leaders would usually elect or choose the successor of the last bishop. This decision is not up to the Pope to decide. The church is still tied with the government until the west Frankish kings lost control over the bishoprics to the territorial princes. During the reign of the Capetian dynasty, most of the counsellors of the kings were the bishops. For example, the first Capetian king, Hugh Capet, had Arnulf, bishop of Orléans, appointed as his close counsellor. He is a leading example of royalist bishop. Bishops are trying to distant themselves from the holy see and they are keeping the interference of the popes with the kings of France (Hallam and Everard FIND PAGE). FOR WHOLE PARAGRAPH OKAY GO TO

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