Summary: Making Healthy Decisions

1320 Words 6 Pages
When shopping for groceries, it is important to make healthy decisions. Making healthy choices is a decision based upon prices, availability, and personal preference. However, it is easy to choose the unhealthy options when the food industry is using brightly colored packaging and empty promises to lure people to purchase their food. Hence, the food industry can be seen as the main contributor to obesity. Nobody wants to be told what to eat, but with clever marketing, the food industry does not have to say a word. People crave sugar. Sadly, for some people, sugar is at the top of their food pyramid along side fat. Marketing sugar is an extensive part of the food industry. Breakfast cereals, microwavable meals, and fast-foods are all a part …show more content…
When a person becomes hungry they are driven to eat by many forces. Whether that is due to an emotional need or the taste, aroma, appearance, and texture of processed foods, people will eat almost anything when they are hungry. As much as the components of processed foods contrast, sugar can do it all (Moss 41-42). Our bodies are hardwired for sweets. One of the main culprits of sugar marketing is breakfast cereals. For children watching morning cartoons, TV advertisements of Lucky Charms and Froot Loops are a big influence on what kids want to eat for breakfast. One has to wonder if it is cereal or candy they are eating. When we look at the cereals on the supermarket shelves these days, we mostly see sugary options. Some cereals contain 50% sugar. Products like that should be labeled imitation cereal or cereal confections. Stores should consider putting those cereals in the candy aisle (Moss 75). Kids now think that breakfast is not fun without the sugary goodness of breakfast cereal. On page 81 Moss …show more content…
Despite the savings made, super sizing nearly triples the caloric count of the food that is eaten. Studies say impulse decisions are made when it comes to fast-food. The impulse comes from such low prices (Cardello 158). Wouldn 't it make sense for restaurants to lower the prices of salads and raise those of unhealthy options? This would solve impulse decisions and altogether, it would solve the obesity created by eating unhealthy, super sized fast-food. Unfortunately restaurants do not see it that way. They see people continuing to buy unhealthy options even if the prices were raised. If super sizing is that important to the food industry, how about super sizing the right products such as salads and low-calorie drinks. Consumers will always look for the good

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