The Woman Suffrage Movement

1146 Words 5 Pages
Many history books tell about glorious battles, courageous military leaders, and larger-than-life discoveries; however, they downplay substantial social events that have had immeasurable ramifications on all aspects of America’s history, including the woman suffrage movement. The woman suffrage movement was a women’s rights crusade in the 1800s and early 1900s that gave females the right to vote as well as the right to attend college and to hold a professional job. This is one of the social movements that makes America exceptional, and as Alexis de Tocqueville says “If America ever ceases to be good, then America will cease to be great.” (6) The woman suffrage movement has extraordinary value and, although there were some road bumps along …show more content…
The woman suffrage movement began influencing America during the early 1800s when Elizabeth Stanton and Lucretia Mott gathered women, and men, at the Seneca Falls Convention ("The Fight for Women’s Suffrage"). This convention kick-started the women’s rights movements in the United States, which closely followed the movement which started earlier in Europe. Soon after this convention, the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) was founded. This society confronted the political and social issues that surrounded women in America. By the 1890s, the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) was fully functioning in society ("The Women 's Rights Movement, 1848–1920 | US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives"). "Our ‘Pathway’ is straight to the ballot box,” declares Stanton, “with no variableness nor shadow of turning." With this in mind, women began campaigning specifically for obtaining the right to vote. They slowly began to gain this right from individual states, then in 1920 supreme court ruled that females in any state could vote ("The Fight for Women’s Suffrage"). This was a major leap that helped the NAWSA obtain more members and volunteers especially …show more content…
Starting in the 1880s, the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA) lacked major funding ("The Women 's Rights Movement, 1848–1920 | US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives"). They had support from a considerable amount of states, however they did not gain enough financial support to make any real difference. This was mostly due to the fact that the states that supported them were new out west and lacked funding within the state. In the other part of the country, the NWSA was financially blooming. With their major headquarters stationed in New England, they were able to be noticed. However they failed to persuade people to become a part of the movement causing very little participation from the citizens. As the History House asserted “This split occurred in 1869 and weakened the suffrage movement for the next two decades,” ("The Fight for Women’s Suffrage"). With both associations failing in opposite ways, they made the best decision possible and decided to join together in 1890 ("The Women 's Rights Movement, 1848–1920 | US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives"). As the newly formed NAWSA grew, the impact they made in the 1900s far surpassed anything they had done in the past century. The culmination of the NAWSA

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